Purls of Wisdom

Alumni Profile Series: Lizzy Gee

Posted by Cameron Lee on Sun, Nov 04, 2018 @ 10:00 AM

We hope you enjoy the fourth installment in the Alumni Profile Series, which features profiles of the Handwork Studio graduates (and some current members) and gives you an inside look into their lives!

For a shorter biography of Lizzy Gee, check out the alumni page of our website! 

Lizzy Gee Headshot

Name: Elizabeth Marie Gee
Age: 22
Education: 2018 graduate of the Pratt Institute
Majors: Fashion Design BFA
Website: www.lizzygee.com
Instagram: @treslizzy

 

Who is Lizzy Gee?

SHe's a Rebel 1-198551-editedFrom perusing Lizzy Gee’s website before our interview, it is easy to tell that she is a colorful person, an imbues that sense of boldness and brightness in her designs. Seeing Lizzy’s outfit and a small section of her apartment on our video call only confirms that she loves color, and I can’t want to hear what she has to say. Lizzy graduated from the Pratt Institute in New York just a few months before our interview with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Fashion Design and is currently working as a head teacher at The Handwork Studio as she makes plans for her future.

I ask Lizzy a few fun questions to get us into the interview, and in the process learn that the night before our conversation she watched the movie Stardust on Netflix. (Lizzy is a huge sci-fi and fantasy fan.) If Lizzy could be any animal, she would be a flamingo because she loves pink, and her website is full of vibrant shades of the color. Lastly, I ask Lizzy what she wants to be when she grows up, and she laughs. “Well, I’m being it! A fashion designer!”

 

Early Involvement in Handwork and The Handwork Studio

Lizzy started knitting classes at the Handwork Studio when she was eight, and after a year of that she started machine sewing. Lizzy also did Fashion Bootcamp at the Handwork Studio for four or so years, and credits her experiences there with helping her develop her entire fashion skill set before she went to college. “Without them, I wouldn’t have known any of it, because no one in my family can even hand sew. So I’m officially the seamstress of the house, thanks to them.” Lizzy was interested in handwork before she began attending the Handwork Studio classes, however, because she was always intrigued by the idea that she could draw something and have an idea and then actually bring that idea to life. She dabbled in making board games when she was younger, but nothing clicked with her more than knitting and making clothes.

While she was 13 (and still attending Fashion Bootcamp at the Handwork Studio), Lizzy also started working as an assistant instructor, helping out at birthday parties and camp during the summer at the Narberth studio, an experience that foreshadowed her current position as head teacher. Lizzy tells me about a time during Fashion Bootcamp that stands out to her as a perfect representation of how great the Handwork Studio was in helping build her as a person and a designer. “I remember Ms. Alisha and Ms. Julia tried to help me figure out how to thread a serger. That’s a much more complex machine than a sewing machine, and it uses five threads, and they sat with me for like two hours trying to figure it out. That was the next step, and they were happy to help me through it.”

 

Lizzy’s Journey

Wilder WoMann 2-379538-editedBecause Lizzy has known that she wanted to go into fashion for so long, she was able to start having incredible job and internship experience at a relatively young age. When she was still in high school, Lizzy took classes at the Moore College of Art and Design and interned at the costume department at Villanova University (where they thought she was a college student until the very end of the internship, when they found out she was only 16!).

Once she arrived in New York for her freshman year at Pratt, Lizzy started interning right away, even though her university advised incoming students against doing so because companies might try to take advantage of them. Lizzy heeded the warning but once met a woman near her school named Julie Mollo who had her own studio and made performance-wear for different musicians, Lizzy jumped at the opportunity to learn from the business and see what it takes to run your own brand. Lizzy planned to intern for bigger and bigger brands over the years to gain a variety of working experience in different environments, so her second internship was with a designer named Mara Hoffman. Hoffman taught Lizzy all about print design, something she had been interested in ever since she attended the Handwork Studio. Lizzy’s third internship was with her “idol, Christian Siriano. When I got an internship with him, I was like ‘I think this is the pinnacle. I don’t know how I can get any better than this.’ I just love that he does plus size too, and I’ve only ever made designs for myself, and I’ve been plus size since middle school. So it was really nice to meet someone who doesn’t care what size you are, and is going to make something nice no matter what.”

I, like Lizzy, attend university in New York, so I ask her what it was like to move from outside of Pennsylvania to the city. “I love it. It’s definitely a different pace than any other city. But I love it. I think it helps that I went to a school that still has a campus feeling, so you feel that calm amongst the crazy. If I had gone to Parsons or FIT [Fashion Institute of Technology] I would have felt very overwhelmed and I wouldn’t have stayed after graduating. But I plan to stay for at least a year.” I agree. I love the city, but without a quiet, collegiate campus, my university experience would be very different than it is now.Wilder WoMann 4

Like many people, my sense of the fashion industry, especially in New York, is that it can be pretty cutthroat. Movies like The Devil Wears Prada depict a very specific image of what that world resembles, and I ask Lizzy if it was at all daunting to enter that universe as a young designer. “There’s definitely stereotypes for a reason,” she tells me, “And I’ve met all of them. Surprisingly enough there’s all different kinds of personalities and brands out there, but you can find a really different experience than the harsh, cutthroat environment they make it out to be. My very first big brand internship was Mara Hoffman and...it was one of the most welcoming environments. So it depends on the environment, and there’s definitely brands out there that can take advantage and make you feel like you can’t do it, but there’s also brands that want you to succeed. Even though The Devil Wears Prada tries to tell you different.”

Apparently, other people in Lizzy’s life were concerned about how she would fare in the New York fashion industry as well because she would get a lot of "'Oh, you’re too nice to be in fashion. Oh, you’re too sweet, you’re not gonna make it. But you can always be like a teacher?’” Lizzy ignored all those comments. “My main thing is to run my own brand, and the only way to do that is if I work for a brand...Why not try to go in there and make a change? I love it so much; I’m not gonna give up just because some people tell me they think my designs are ugly or something.”

 

Lizzy’s Art

As I guessed from looking at her website and seeing her for the first time, Lizzy loves color. She elaborates on her art and vision, and why she creates the way that she does.

SHe's a Rebel 2“I always have had a lot of color and boldness with my designs. I try to balance femininity and edge, so I design for a girl who wants to wear pink and wear bright colors, but also, you know, don’t mess with her. That’s the vibe I’m trying to bring out. Also when I went to Pratt, I started to learn about menswear, and I love the idea of helping straight men not have a fear of dressing flamboyant and wearing what they want. I have a lot of friends who are guys, and they love my designs, but they’re too afraid. If they want to wear a really bold print, they’re worried people will assume certain things about them rather than think they just really enjoy color."

"I want to create a brand that blends that aesthetic together and is not really defined by gender or a demographic; it’s just a personality. And that is a more feminine edge, I guess. It would be made sustainably. What I tried to learn in school is the best way to sustainably create prints and textiles, because that’s where most of the pollution comes from in fashion. All that dying, all that manipulating of materials to create the fabrics we have. Which ones are the best in terms of decomposing, which ones last the most so we won’t be throwing away garments? I’m trying to find a universal quality to having fun with prints and color.”

Lizzy’s artistic vision changed significantly while she attended Pratt, and she expects more change to come. She made five mini-collections before she even started college, so she thought she knew what she wanted, but learning about menswear, prints, and accessories at Pratt helped expand Lizzy’s horizons. She’s now more open to starting her brand with accessories and building into clothes or experimenting with a more versatile range of techniques and demographics.

 

Trials and Successes

One instance immediately comes to mind when I ask Lizzy if there’s anything she’s done over the last few years that she’s especially proud of.

Dancing Lobsters

“I’ve always dabbled in costume design, but that’s never been where I definitely wanted to go because I want to design for the everyday person as well. I’ve never wanted to design clothes that feel exclusive, you know? That’s why I get rigid if I know I have to sell something for slightly more expensive than I’d buy it at. But there was a costume design competition at Pratt. They partnered with a famous boutique in Manhattan to do this competition, and the winner’s costume would be displayed in the front window. Which is a dream come true for anyone who wants to show their own designs. I initially didn’t think I was going to do it because I was stressed out with what I was doing, and the theme was under the sea, and I was like, okay, a million people are gonna do mermaids and jellyfish. I like to put a humorous spin on my work, and I couldn’t think of anything for the first week. My professors kept telling me to apply and try, and midnight the night before it was due I remembered The Amanda Show, and my favorite part of that show was with Judge Trudy, who always yelled “Bring in the Dancing Lobsters!” and I was like ‘Oh, my God. I’m gonna make a dancing lobster. But I’m gonna make it sexy and elegant, but it's still gonna be the dancing lobster. A costume that you can dance in.’ So that’s what I made.”

Lizzy describes the lobster dress as “kind of cartoonish but elegant,” with sequins, long antennae, and a tail like a train. “And I ended up winning,” she tells me, with a smile. It was the first time Lizzy had a window front with her name on it, and she was thrilled when she was it in person for the first time. After the competition, Lizzy ended up getting a contract with the store and sold a few more dresses to them.

When I ask Lizzy if she would change anything about the last few years, she has a surprising and refreshing answer. “I don’t know if I would change anything.” She pauses for a long time to think, and I make sure to tell her that she doesn’t have to have something and that it’s a good thing if she doesn’t want to change anything about her recent life. Ultimately, however, Lizzy tells me that if she “had to choose something...I did a summer abroad in London, and I loved it so much; I applied for the college experience and decided not to go. I wasn’t sure if I should do that, because I was so young. But after going, I totally could have done it. But I love New York. So if anything, maybe I would have done that as my fashion degree. So if I decide to get my masters I’d go there.”Wilder WoMann 1

Lizzy’s final words prove to be fantastic advice for anyone reading this, but especially for kids at the Handwork Studio who wish to pursue careers in fashion. “Don’t listen to anybody who says what you’re doing is weird or out of the ordinary or that it can’t happen,” she says, “Because you can make it happen. That’s literally what being a designer is. You design clothes you’ve never seen before. What makes you different is what makes you succeed. That’s not pushed in the classroom enough. There’s multiple ways to get to where you wanna be...Having patience with yourself and learning the skills to create is the hardest at the beginning. I’m teaching a group of machine sewers right now, and they already think they’re bad at it, almost. Every time they make a little mistake. That’s probably the hardest thing. Once you learn all those mistakes are learning experiences you can build upon, fashion will come so naturally to you, and you can go and have a career in it.”


Photo 1: Portrait of Lizzy Gee
Photo 2: Lizzy wearing clothes from her "S/he's a Rebel" Collection, 2016
Photo 3: Model wearing clothes from Lizzy's "Wilder Wo/mann" Collection, 2017
Photo 4: Model wearing clothes from Lizzy's "Wilder Wo/mann" Collection, 2017
Photo 5: Model wearing clothes from Lizzy's "S/he's a Rebel" Collection, 2016
Photo 6: Lizzy's "Dancing Lobsters" costume in the window of Screaming Mimis
Photo 7: Lizzy and models wearing clothes from her "Wilder Wo/mann" Collection, 2017

Tags: The Handwork Studio, Handwork, Alumni, Alumni Profile Series, Profile, Lizzy Gee

Alumni Profile Series: Emilie Patton

Posted by Cameron Lee on Sun, Oct 21, 2018 @ 10:00 AM

We’re happy to share the third installment in the Alumni Profile Series, which features profiles of the Handwork Studio graduates (and some current members) and gives you an inside look into their lives!

For a shorter biography of Emilie Patton, check out the alumni page of our website!

Emilie Patton headshot-1

Name: Emilie Marie Patton
Age: 21
Education: Tyler School of Art at Temple University in Philadelphia, PA, Final Year
Majors: Fibers and Material Studies

 

Who is Emilie Patton?

Emilie Patton (Emilie, not Emily, a mistake I made the first time we emailed) has a bright, bubbly personality and a friendliness about her that makes me look forward to speaking with her even more. Before we get into the meat of the interview, I realize that both Emilie and Julia Haines, a Handwork Studio alumnus I interviewed a few weeks before, both attend the Tyler School of Art at Temple University and are both majoring in Fibers and Material Studies. When I ask Emilie about it (without specifying Julia by name), she guesses who I’m talking about immediately, and tells me that in addition to being in the same, relatively small class at Tyler, they also danced together in high school. Small world! 

Here’s Emilie Patton in a flash: The last thing she watched before our interview was a series on Netflix called Haven, which she describes as a police show, but also a milder version of Supernatural. She laughs as she tells me she’s on season three and only started it two weeks ago. If Emilie could be an animal, she would be a rabbit, because “they have such nice eyes, eat grass all day, and hop around.” I ask what she wants to be when she grows up, and Emilie tells me that she plans to be “a working artist.” She pauses. “Well, a successful working artist,” she adds with a laugh.

 

Early Involvement in Handwork and The Handwork Studio

Emilie first truly got involved in the handwork world when she started taking classes at the Handwork Studio in 6th grade. She took a sewing class with her friends and made pajama bottoms, and from then on she just “really liked going there.” Emilie attended a Handwork Studio class every summer, and sometimes she would attend classes at night during the school year as well. I wonder if she expressed any interest in handwork before she started going to the Handwork Studio classes, or if her parents just decided to enroll her, and she makes it clear that she “was really interested in it. My great grandmother was a seamstress, and I’ve always wanted to learn how to sew because I learned hand sewing from a family friend when I was around 6. My mom doesn’t know how to sew, and my grandmother who lived an hour and a half away couldn’t teach me because I wasn’t there, so going to this was the best option that I had to learn to do this skill that I really wanted to learn.”

Emilie fondly remembers when she took the Fashion Bootcamp at the Handwork Studio when she entered high school. She tells me that it was a nice environment, a really fun class to take and that she and her friends had a good time making garments together. “It was a good highlight of my childhood.”


Emilie’s Journey

Emilie patton outfitsUnlike Julia, who decided to apply to Tyler very shortly before the deadline, Emilie was aware that she wanted to go to art school earlier, but she also struggled with choosing between art and another path. Emilie was originally going to attend school for pharmacy (her dad’s a pharmacist, and her mom’s an ICU nurse), but then she took art classes in high school and realized that she could apply the skills she loved, like sewing, to 3D art, amongst other things, and “it kind of took off from there.” At the end of her sophomore year of high school she told her parents that she didn’t want to go to school for anything related to health care, but art instead.

Emilie is from Havertown, PA, a place she describes as a “small town,” so everyone knew her parents and knew that Emilie originally wanted to go into a medical field. When she decided to embark on her art school journey, not everyone was thrilled. “Some of my high school teachers told me that I wouldn’t find a job,” she admits, but a beloved high school art teacher helped her get to where she is now. “You’ve got to find those people who believe in you and stay with them.” Emilie pushed through the confusion and criticism and took AP art her junior year of high school, an experience that solidified her love for art and convinced her that she was making the right decision by planning to go to art school. “Junior year is when I was like, no I want to do this. I do not want to be a pharmacist for the rest of my life; I want to be an artist. I think taking an art class and seeing I could apply those skills, helped.”

When I ask Emilie if she has had any job or internship experience related to handwork, she hesitates. “This is not like a ‘true job,’” she says, “But I used to teach kids in my neighborhood how to sew. Like on my own, with my friends. I would make bags and bring them to class, and a lot of people asked me where I got them, and I told them I made them by sewing. And in middle school a lot of people wanted me to teach them. I did that freshman year too, in my dorm.” I tell her that even if she doesn’t consider that a “true job,” it’s still really cool. I would love to learn handwork, and if I had a peer who could teach me how to do it, that would be so much easier. Rather than try to teach myself, or go to a class. “I taught myself how to knit,” Emilie laughs, "And it’s a lot easier to learn from someone else.”


Emilie’s Art

Emilie Patton (front)We cycle back around to talk about the Tyler School of Art, and what Emilie’s life has been like attending school there. What kinds of classes does she take; does she concentrate on something specific in her major; does she mostly take studio classes?

“I focus more on garment construction,” she tells me, “And on the ideas of processes. I really like to weave my own fabric. The idea of making something completely from scratch really intrigues me, and I usually focus my work on garments and exploring the body through clothing. A lot of the classes I take are - I took a garment construction class last year and a weaving class, and that’s kind of where it started - but I like taking classes that are more hands-on in physical processes. Silk screening, natural dyes, everything’s kind of from the ground up. That just really intrigues me.” Emilie typically takes three studio classes a semester, and one non-studio, so much of her time is focused on actually making art.

In my experience, artists go through a period when they come into their style and discover their artistic voice, and this period can last anywhere from a few months to a few decades because style is always evolving. I ask Emilie to tell me about her artistic passion, how and when she developed her style, and whether her interest in building structures from the ground up was something she always wanted to do, or whether it came into play later. “It came into play later,” she responds. “Way, way later. I’ve always liked the idea of the processes of things, but more recently, last semester, it took hold. I was in Rome for four months for a semester abroad, and there were no fibers classes over there, so I was taking whatever I could that was craft centered. I took bookbinding, paper making, and a sketchbook class. I really struggled. I had the worst block ever, it was awful. It wasn’t until the very end until one of my professors told me ‘Just don’t think’ and it clicked. So I started making things, not as a concept, but that the way of doing things is in itself an art.”

Emilie told me at the beginning of the interview that she wants to be a working artist. I wonder if she has any idea what she wants that to look like.

“My goal in life is to own my own brand in a sense. I’m really interested in functionality. I want to do work based on making something functional in someone’s life, not just extremely contemporary, which I don’t have an exact knack for. I’m jealous of people who have that knack. I would love to own a store where I could transform my work into things people can use every day in their lives, and become almost a household name, in a way. That’s always been something I’ve wanted to do.”


Trials and Successes

When I get to the part of the interview where I typically ask what the interviewee is the proudest of, or for an accomplishment of theirs they’d like to share, I’m pleasantly surprised when Emilie wants to give me two. Both pertain to garments she’s made, at two different times in her life. Emilia Patton (back)-1

“Senior year I made my prom dress, and it was one of my favorite dresses I’ve ever made. It doesn’t fit me anymore, but it was just something I didn’t think I’d be able to make structurally. I made the pattern myself, and I never did that before, and it was something I was really proud of.” She had to sew herself into it, she laughs, but it was worth it. “The second one was designing a three-piece collection of 11 pieces total for a class I took last year. I made a killer pair of pants that were completely pleated around the bottom that took me five days to make. I worked on them for like 12 hours a day, and when I was done I was so happy, and they looked so good on my model, and I was like ‘Yes! Finally!’”

When I ask Emilie the opposite - to tell me something she wishes she could change about the past few years - I’m surprised by how similar her answer is to the one Julia Haines gave me. “I wish I had a better sense of my artwork a couple of years ago. Going through that struggle of finding your own style is really hard. Because you doubt yourself a lot.”

Close to the end of the interview, Emilie tells me another story about her time at the Handwork Studio. “This is my second year working at the Handwork Studio, and I had the opportunity to help teach the Fashion Bootcamp last year, and I’ll be doing it this year as well if there are enough campers. And it’s really inspiring to see these girls who are like 13 and 14 make a two-piece collection from scratch, from fabric they get to choose, and they get to design everything, and they find patterns and alter patterns. It’s so inspiring seeing that as someone who does this almost as their career. Seeing it start so young kind of reignites the fire and makes me think 'Yes, this is what I want to do! This is great!' It’s so great having these kids get this environment that, a lot of times, they don’t get at school or anywhere else, and people saying, 'You can do this, we believe in you.' And then they do amazing things. It’s crazy. A girl made a dress based on the night sky, and I helped her dye it, and she put all these stars on it, and it was beautiful. Like that came out of your mind. You made that. It’s such a nice feeling that you can help these girls get there.”

I want to end with some advice Emilie offered for any kids at the Handwork Studio who may be inspired to follow the same path as her, or just to pursue their passions: “Stick with it, because there’s going to be times when you wanna give up, and you think your work isn’t good enough or it’s too hard or stressful. People will try to tell you that you’re in school for something you don’t need but stick with it, because you want to do something you’re going to enjoy for the rest of your life. If it’s something you’re passionate about, keep it.”


Photo 1: Portrait of Emilie Patton
Photo 2: Emilie's designs
Photo 3: Emilie wearing her designs, front
Photo 4: Emilie wearing her designs, back

Tags: The Handwork Studio, Handwork, Alumni, Alumni Profile Series, Emilie Patton

Alumni Profile Series: Julia Haines

Posted by Cameron Lee on Sun, Sep 23, 2018 @ 10:00 AM

The Alumni Profile Series will feature profiles of graduates (and some current members) of the Handwork Studio and give you an inside look into how they maintain their passion for the craft! We hope that learning about the alumni will inspire your kids to follow in their footsteps and help them see that no matter who they are, what their background in handwork is, and what they hope to be when they grow up, they can do anything they put their minds to!

For a shorter biography of Julia Haines, check out the alumni page of our website! 

Julia Haines Headshot

Name: Julia Claire Haines
Age: 22
Education: 5th year student in the Tyler School of Art at Temple University in Philadelphia, PA
Majors: Fibers and Material Studies, with a certificate in Art Education
Website: www.juliaclairehaines.com/

 

Who is Julia Haines?

I sit down to talk to Julia Claire Haines on a sunny Thursday afternoon in the summer. There is a brief bit of fumbling as we both try to get our video and audio to work, but after a very friendly introduction, we get down to the interview.

Julia Haines Portrait

After asking some standard questions about her education and age, I tell Julia that I want to ask her some fun questions, so our readers can get to know her a bit more. I end up learning that the last thing Julia watched on TV was an episode of the second season of Netflix’s Queer Eye with her mom and that if she were an animal, she would be a hedgehog because she is “small and dutiful and sometimes prickly, but mostly soft.” When I ask Julia what her favorite type of art is, she immediately tells me that fiber art is her passion. She uses fabric and other craft-based mediums to create 2D and 3D works, and she particularly loves silkscreen printing on fabric and embroidery. To Julia, handwork is a very directional and soothing process.

When I ask her what she wants to be when she grows up, Julia responds enthusiastically with “A lot of things! But I graduate next year, and when I graduate, I want to teach art, either in Philly or one of the surrounding districts.” She wants to teach at a public school, preferably K-12, and credits working with elementary aged students at the Handwork Studio for helping her become more open to teaching younger children. 

 

Early Involvement in Handwork and The Handwork Studio

Julia’s formal introduction to handwork is synonymous with her introduction to the Handwork Studio because she became involved with both in elementary school when her mom won a week’s worth of classes for her in a raffle at the Alex’s Lemonade Stand annual fundraiser. Before attending the Handwork Studio’s classes, Julia tried - unfortunately unsuccessfully - to teach herself to knit and was interested in sewing and embroidery, so she loved learning these skills in a more structured setting at the Handwork Studio. After being a part of the Handwork Studio family for several years, Julia took a brief break, then came back as a CIT for some time during high school. Then, she tells me, “I went to Tyler and I kind of returned to my roots, I think because, for me, my foundation in art is definitely through sewing and handcraft and not necessarily in drawing and painting. So once I became more confident in my abilities as an artist at Temple, I started really diving into fiber practices again.” Julia currently works as a counselor at the Narberth studio and ended up applying for the position after bumping into owner and founder Laura Kelly this spring.

I ask Julia to reflect on the experiences she had at the Handwork Studio as a child and how they impacted her, and she makes it clear that they “were definitely formative. I learned how to do these skills that pretty much transferred to my university education, which is kind of cool, I think. To learn something when you’re like ten years old, eleven years old, and that actually comes into your college experience.”

Another part of Julia's experience at the Handwork Studio that impacted her was the atmosphere. “I remember feeling so comfortable and safe when I was there and that contentment that I felt while I was there was a good gauge in every other situation I found myself in growing up. Whether that was like formal activities or with friends. I kind of knew what this really nice, gentle comfort was.”

 

Julia’s Journey

There are plenty of kids at the Handwork Studio who want to pursue pathes like Julia’s and go to art school or continue to involve handwork in their careers in some way, so I ask her about her work experience and what led her to decide to attend the Tyler School of Art. It turns out Julia has been involved in a lot over the past few years and loves to keep herself busy, and the diversity of her work experience only reflects the sentiment that she wants to be a lot of things when she “grows up.”

The summer after her freshman year at Tyler Julia worked as an education intern at The Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia, where she researched their Navajo textile collection and compiled an information booklet for docents who lead student tours. She also worked for the same foundation the summer after her sophomore year of art school, but this time she went into their classrooms and evaluated how well the artists were teaching kids about the Barnes artwork and helped expand the children's’ critical thinking and analysis skills. This same summer Julia worked for Anthropologie as a display intern. In between all this Julia has worked on the sets of several movies doing costumes, photography, and production work, and in addition to working at the Handwork Studio this past summer, she was the blogger and insight editor for one of her professors, who sells tufting guns. Handwork, she says, has basically played a roll in all the jobs she has had so far.

As someone who briefly considered going to art school myself, I am genuinely interested in Julia’s choice to go to the Tyler School of Art, which she describes as a very last minute decision. She tells me that she took advanced art in high school but never considered art school because she thought it meant mostly drawing and painting realism and she wasn’t as good at that as she wanted to be. When she was a senior Julia was accepted to Temple University as a biology major, but January of that year she decided impulsively to apply to Tyler and scrambled her portfolio together in a month. “It was the smartest and the dumbest thing I’ve ever done,” she laughs when I tell her how impressive that is.

HWHaines12-1Once she got to Tyler, Julia never took any class or experience for granted because she just got in “by the skin of my teeth - the day before the deadline-” so she was open to any and all critique about her work. When I ask her what her typical day looks like, Julia tells me that her class schedule is pretty low maintenance - three studio classes a semester, each two and a half hours long and twice a week, and then two or three other classes that occur one to three times a week. This past year Julia went to the studio every day after classes, especially when she was busy preparing for her thesis show between November and January, and she easily spent 40 hours there each week. She admits that spending so much time in the studio can sometimes be rough, but that having friends both in the studio to keep her company and friends outside of the art school to keep her grounded and supports her makes it better. “If you love it, it’s fine,” she tells me. “It’s the only time that your only obligation is just to make art and if you don’t take advantage of it, you’re not being smart. At the end of the day, it’s fun.”

 

Julia’s Art

IMG_0719+copy+2I ask Julia to describe her art, and from where she draws inspiration. Does she have a theme that most of her art revolves around? Has that developed with college? “I’ve reached the most mature phase of my art where there’s this theme I’m really engaged with,” she tells me, “And mediums I’m very committed to so I’m able to compound my work one on top of another.” She warns me that she’s essentially reciting her artist’s statement and can send it to me if I’d like (she does!), but explains the concepts behind her art anyway.

“I’m inspired by the impact that genetics play in our lives, both biologically, geographically, and politically. I draw a lot of inspiration from my mom’s side of the family who immigrated to the US at the turn of the century to a coal town and exploring how each generation changes but how these initial industrial towns that were hubs of immigration have gone into a decline and that is often politicized by all sides of the political spectrum. I’m sort of evaluating the romanticization of these industrial towns and how they impact the future generations. And the mediums that I work in to explore this theme are screen prints that I print on fabric, and these prints are derived from photographs that I’ve taken specifically of the town that my great-grandparents and my grandparents grew up in, specifically their blocks and their houses. And I’m especially fascinated with these very small but beautiful details in architecture such as shingles or molding that I then try to extrapolate on a much larger scale either through installation or soft sculpture. And I play with either very muted or very vivid colors depending on what emotion I’m trying to evoke with the piece.”HWHaines11-1

I’m impressed that she can speak so openly and eloquently about her art considering it’s difficult to analyze your own work, and she tells me that it definitely took her a long time to focus on that theme. When you first go to art school, she says, people are “making art about just anything” and she got caught up in that wave, because “it’s hard to be introspective and not oversimplify yourself.” Over the years she’s focused more on making art for herself and not for others, and, in her words, “a lot has changed politically since I entered freshman year in 2014,” she is now more interested in “why politicians target these towns and what they had to gain from them.”


Trials and Successes

HWHaines001I warn Julia that we’re getting to the end of my long list of questions, but that I still have a few important ones left. I ask her what she’s done that she’s the proudest of in the last few years, and she says her thesis show without hesitation. Many complications went into the show, and she spent a wild two months putting it together, but in the end, it was worth all the stress. She tells me that she took a lot of things that were painful to her and translated them to a large-scale installation - larger scale than she had ever done before - and it turned out great. After her thesis show, Julia had to prepare for another show in April, and she said that through all this stress she learned how to trust her decisions more.

When I ask Julia what she wishes she could change about the last few years, she answers me easily, and confidently. “I could be hard on myself and I could say ‘I wish you were more honest with your art practice and you weren’t trying to make art for other people and you were just focusing on yourself first and other people second.’ Because I feel like at the beginning I was very focused on what my critique would be like and what people would think of it, not necessarily what I even thought of it. I was just picking stuff that I thought looked good or was pretty. So if I could, I would go back and change that, but I feel like that’s just something that happens with time and there's no point in being sad about that. I would have been more selective about some of the people I chose to spend my time with. I think your gut instincts are usually correct about people, and I should have relied on those instincts more. Academics wise I wouldn’t really change anything. I think things happened the way they were supposed to.”HWHaines004

I think that’s a great philosophy, and I tell her so, and she, humbly, shakes her head and thanks me.

Finally, we reach the last of my many questions. Does Julia have anything else to say about the Handwork Studio? She thinks for a good moment before telling me that being back at the Handwork Studio and in that community of educators has been wonderful and that it is great to see people’s passion and how much they support each other.

“[The Handwork Studio] definitely changed a lot of things about my life, and I know it will change things about other people’s lives too.”


Photo 1: Portrait of Julia Haines
Photo 2: Julia with her project, "In This Last of Meeting Places," 2018
Photo 3: Piece from "In This Last of Meeting Places," 2018
Photo 4: Piece from "In This Last of Meeting Places," 2018
Photo 5: Piece from "In This Last of Meeting Places," 2018
Photo 6: Piece from "Point of Replication," 201
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Photo 7: Piece from "Point of Replication," 2018

Tags: The Handwork Studio, Handwork, Alumni, Alumni Profile Series, Profile, Julia Haines

Learn about the History of Needle Felting and How to Make Your Own Adorable Felt Creations This Summer!

Posted by Cameron Lee on Sun, Aug 12, 2018 @ 10:00 AM

If you’re like me, the term “felting” might not ring a bell when you first hear it, and you may be confused about its significance. But chances are you have seen a felted creation before and not even realized it!

Martha Stewart penguin needle felting

Felting is the “process of separating, tangling, and relocking animal fibers found in items such as yarn or wool,” and can either be achieved through a wet technique (which we will talk about on the blog next week!) or a dry technique, which is typically done with a needle. When needle felting, t

he crafter uses a special barbed tool to repeatedly stab into the wool, pulling the fiber into itself and ultimately creating a round, firm shape. Once this firm, felted piece of wool is created, you can add more felted shapes or pieces of wool to form a sculpture!

Felting has been around since the Neolithic period, and samples of felting date back to the Bronze and Iron Ages. Felted creations were used to keep people warm and dry during a time when knitting wasn’t yet invented! Nomadic people in Central and East Asia still practice felt making, using the craft to create rugs, tents, and clothing both for themselves and for tourists, and Roman soldiers made breastplates, tunics, boots, and socks out of felt because it is a relatively speedy process that requires fewer tools than some other handwork techniques. Legend has it that Saint Clement of Metz and Saint Christopher filled their sandals with wool while fleeing persecution to protect them from blisters and that at the end of their long journey all the walking and sweat had turned the wool in their shoes to felted socks! These days felting has come back into fashion in Great Britain, Scandinavia, and the United States, and more modern designs and techniques are always being invented to adapt to current felting trends.felted creatures, Narberth handwork studio

Felt is used in anything from cars to musical instruments to picture frames, and to create hats, jackets, decorations, pillows, and bags, but its most exciting usage is probably to create figurines and sculptures! Animals are very popular to make with dry felting because their fuzzy hair and fur is easily copied using wool. Before you start trying to create needle felted sculptures, however, you’ll need some tools. The first thing you should acquire is wool! It may be beneficial to do some research on the best type of wool for felting because there is no general consensus in the felting community on which type of wool is better, but I am confident that you will find the perfect material for your project! Next, you need a felting needle, which has sharp barbs on it that all point in the same direction in order to pull the wool into a firm, sculpted shape. Finally, you should have a foam block or a sponge on which to felt so that you don’t hurt yourself or damage your needle or the table while stabbing your wool.Chick needle felting feltify

Once you’ve gotten your needle felting tools, it’s all about practice! You can start by following this Handwork Studio YouTube tutorial to learn how to make a felted turkey or this YouTube tutorial to learn how to felt an owl, just in time for fall! You can also try these really cool felted spider earrings to get you in the mood for Halloween. If you want to create something more summery, you can also make a chick, a rabbit, or a koala, all out of spheres, or check out this list or this site to find more amazing step-by-step needle felting lessons. Needle felting is an incredible activity to try with your kids this summer, and not only is it fun to pass the time, but they end up with adorable figurines and sculptures at the end! If you’re not so sure about teaching your kids how to needle felt on your own, you can always send them to The Handwork Studio’s camps and classes so they can learn amazing handcraft skills, make friends, and have a wholesome, unique summer experience. If you do try out needle felting, post a picture of your creation on Instagram with the hashtag #SewMoreLove! We would love to see the fantastic things you create. Have a great week, try some needle felting, let us know how it went, and then tune in next week to learn about wet felting! 

Image Descriptions
1) Person dry felting penguin, Martha Stewart
2) Dry felted figures, Narberth Handwork Studio camp
3) Dry felted chick, Feltify
4) Dry felted snails, Narberth Handwork Studio camp

Felted snails, Narberth handwork studio

Tags: Fun, The Handwork Studio, Summer, activities, Handwork, Kids Activities, Felting, Dry Felting, Needle Felting

Maker Monday: College Fashionista Katie Hitchens

Posted by Kelsey Underwood on Mon, Jun 26, 2017 @ 11:01 AM

DSC_0813-1.jpgProfile

Name: Katie Hitchens

Age: 21

School: University of Delaware (UD)  

Studio: The Handwork Studio

Bio: Katie Hitchens, a rising fashion merchandising senior at the University of Delaware, became a fashionista at a young age. A Disney princess at heart, Hitchens frequently insisted on dressing her best, which often meant wearing a Cinderella gown. 

 

 

Designer Fashionista   

Katie’s love for fashion transformed into curiosity and desire to learn about apparel design and construction. As a high school student, she completed courses in textiles and clothing learning machine sewing, hand sewing and apparel design. During her high school career, Katie actively participated in Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA), a family and consumer sciences student organization. Passionate about apparel construction, she competed in the Fashion Construction STAR Event at the 2013 Delaware State FCCLA Leadership Conference.

Among her creations, Katie is most proud of the draped gown she entered. Draping consists of creating a sewing pattern from scratch by arranging and pinning fabric pieces onto a dressform. Katie said initially mastering the draping technique was a “nightmare.” On a deadline for competition entry, she was determined to turn her design into a reality.

“I kept pushing myself until I finished,” Katie said. “Draping was the first time I felt like a true designer.”

Although she faced challenges, Katie persevered and her hard work earned her a silver medal at the competition.

College Fashionista

As a college student, Katie discovered her passion for the business side of the fashion. Katie aspires to work as a product developer in the fashion industry--blending her love for apparel design and business together. This summer, with her roots in fashion construction and passion for styling, Katie will pass her fashion construction skills onto the next generation of students at The Handwork Studio as a lead counselor and blog for the College Fashionista as a Style Guru.

Inspired Fashionista    

As a Style Guru, Katie’s recent fashion inspiration has come from her fellow members of the Guru Gang. Although spread across the world, social media has linked the fashionistas allowing them to share their ideas with one another.

“Everyone has unique and interesting ideas,” Katie said.

Among social media platforms, Katie’s favorite is Pinterest.

“I’m practically on that app on a daily basis,” Katie said with exclamation.

She looks forward to what the summer holds.

To Future Fashionistas

In regards to advice for future fashionistas, Katie said, “It sounds cheesy, but follow your dreams no matter how big. I never imagined that I would end up interning for College Fashionista as a Style Guru. Even if you don’t think you have a shot, take it anyway. You never know what great places it might take you.”


Be sure to check back every week to meet another amazing maker!

Want your children to learn and be inspired by Katie this summer, you can find her at our West Chester, PA and Newark, DE Camp. For project ideas join our You Tube Channel or visit our Store.
 
#IndependenceSchool #WesterChester #SummerCamp #MachineSewingCamp #CraftCamp #KidsCanSew #UD

Tags: Machine Sewing, Design, Locations, Summer Camp, Sewing, Fashion, The Handwork Studio, Summer, Fashion & Machine Sewing, Fashion Design, Glamorize Your Doll

Maker Monday: NYC City Fashion Designer Lizzy Gee

Posted by Kelsey Underwood on Mon, Jun 19, 2017 @ 11:00 AM

http://www.lizzygee.com/

Profile

Name: Lizzy Gee

Age: 21

School: Pratt Institute

Studio Location: Brooklyn, NY

Website: http://www.lizzygee.com/

Bio: Lizzy Gee, a rising senior fashion design student at Pratt Institute, has been creating as long as she can remember. She discovered fashion design at The Handwork Studio at the age of eight.

 

 

Fashion Design

Lizzy describes fashion in two words: “wearable art.”

“I discovered fashion design was my favorite form of creating since it combines function and art,” she said.

A comprehensive process, fashion design involves numerous skills to transform sketches into fashion pieces that speak the creator’s vision.

“There's illustration, digital illustration, technical drawing, print design, machine sewing, hand sewing, and so on,” Lizzy said. “Some designers are better at certain stages of the process, compared to others, which helps to differentiate their aesthetic (from other designers).” 

Design Inspiration

Personal experiences and interests inspire Lizzy’s fashion design concepts.

“Anything can possibly inspire me, but overall beauty, love, and humor are the main elements where I find inspiration,” Lizzy said.  

Unique mixes of these elements generate Lizzy’s brilliant ideas--typically involving a story--that she then tells through her designs.

Top DesignLizzy Gee Romper

Lizzy takes most pride in her Rainbow Ruination Romper. 

“It combines much of what I try to achieve through concept and function,” she said. “I designed all textiles as well as the silhouette to show the colorful pollution that is hurting our environment by creating textile patterns with my photography and a silhouette that references hazmat suits used for environmental cleanup.”    

In addition to telling an environmental message, the entirely organic romper provides functional sustainability through the bodice’s ability to transform into various styles. 

Design Challenges   

Lizzy Gee DesignLizzy believes challenges are part of the fashion designer job description.

“Part of the fun with design is to challenge my craft in order to improve,” she said. “I love designing for people in all walks of life, so, in order to see how my ideas transcend different body types and occasions, I must research and plan my design in order to avoid issues once gone on to construct.”     

One of Lizzy’s most recent capsule collections consisted of menswear pieces, new territory for the designer who typically constructs unixsex or womenswear.  

“Even though I was much more anxious to combine my style with menswear, after researching to solidify my line up and creating samples of the garments to fit on the model, the collection came together,” Lizzy said. “I felt even more satisfied with the final product by having overcome the obstacles.”

Everyday Design

Living in an exciting place like Brooklyn, Lizzy has inspiration and ideas constantly around her. She captures all her findings with her camera and files them at her studio.

“I am lucky to have found a profession I love to do even in my free time,”she said. “ I can have a drink with a mini-umbrella, put on a playlist, and sketch new designs anywhere I go."

Design Advice

Lizzy Gee 3.jpegWhen it comes to advice for future fashion designers, Lizzy said, “Try not to listen to others expectations or judgments until you have listened to your own. If what you dream is less practical, you can make it practical by showing the world it can be done. Take every opportunity that has the potential to help you achieve your dream. It may not happen overnight, but determination is what builds your dreams. And most importantly, have a ton of fun!”


Be sure to check back every week to meet another amazing maker!

Want your children to learn and be inspired in the same classes that jumpstarted Lizzy's passion for sewing and fashion? You can find our fall classes here. For project ideas join our You Tube Channel or visit our Store.

#TheHandworkStudio #Narthberth #FallSession #HandworkandMachineSewing #FashionandMachineSewing #DesignStudio #KnittingStudio #HomeschoolerClasses #KidsCanSew # Workshops #BirthdayParties #Pratt 

 

 

 

Tags: kids art classes in narberth pennsylvania, Kids Birthday Parties, Fall Class, Fall Class Registration, Machine Sewing, Design, machine sewing classes begin, Classes, Fall, Open Design Studio, Narberth, Knitting, Fashion, The Handwork Studio, Fashion & Machine Sewing, Sewing Machine, Narberth kids' activities, Philadelphia, Narberth, PA

3 Ways To Avoid Boredom on Winter Break Trips

Posted by Libby Foxman on Tue, Nov 01, 2016 @ 11:00 AM

3 Ways To Avoid Boredom on Winter Break Trips

            As thanksgiving and winter break approaches, it is time to start planning for long road trips or plane rides to visit family. With the dreaded question of “are we there yet?” looming, we have compiled a small list of ways to keep your kids occupied on those journeys. Not only will these activities keep your kids busy but they can learn and practice important skills.

 

Movie Sing-A-Long

A great way to pass the time is to have a movie sing-a-long. A lot of Disney movies sell versions that display the song lyrics so your children can sing-a-long to their favorite movie. This is also a great way for young children to practice their reading skills. Since they mostly know the words to the songs, they will be able to associate the words they are singing to the words on the screen. The excitement of this activity will also tire them out so you can enjoy some quiet time after all of that singing. 

 

Car Games

            An easy way to pass the time on a car trip, without needing to bring anything along, is the License Plate Game. As you are driving, see if your kids can find the license plates of as many different states as possible. Obviously, if you are on the east coast, chances are pretty slim that you will find a Hawaii or Alaska license plate but your kids will be so excited about every new state they find. Like the movie sing-a-long, the license plate game is also a great way for your children to practice their reading.

 

Knitting

            Knitting is a great activity to do while traveling because not a lot of materials are needed and the ones that are, are small and portable. All that is needed are knitting needles and yarn. In the same time that it takes to get to your destination, whether that is by car, train, or plane, your child will get a good start on their knitting project. They can also continue with their projects during their down time over the break. By the end of the holiday break, your child could have a new hat or mittens for school!

 Screen_Shot_2016-08-12_at_11.47.02_AM.png

            If your family is home for winter break, The Handwork Studio offers Winter Break Camp. During this one-week camp, campers will be introduced to practical handwork arts such as hand and machine sewing, weaving, and knitting. If you think your child would be interested in this fun winter break camp, head to The Handwork Studio’s website or call (610) 660-9600 to register.

Screen_Shot_2016-08-12_at_11.45.01_AM.png

 

Tags: kids knitting, knitting classes begin, Knitting, The Handwork Studio, Winter Camp

How Sewing Helps You Relax

Posted by Libby Foxman on Tue, Oct 11, 2016 @ 11:00 AM

            Sewing is an extremely useful skill to have as you grow up. It can help instill independence by giving you the skills to make or fix your own clothes. It can also be a useful technique to diminish stress. The concentration needed for the repetitive nature of sewing will allow you to only focus on the act at hand rather than everything else that is going on in your life. The confidence you gain when you finish a project or learn a new technique will have you feeling refreshed when you get back to work.

 Screen_Shot_2016-08-02_at_11.08.38_AM.png

 

Repetitive

            The repetitive nature of sewing makes it productive activity that will allow you to disconnect from the stresses of your everyday life. Repetitive activities that use fine motor skills have been known to decrease anxiety. While repetition of a movement does not require serious thought, it gives you something to focus on. The continuous motions will keep your mind occupied on sewing rather than on the work that is causing you stress.

 

Concentration

The concentration needed to keep good technique will force you to shut off your brain and only focus on the task at hand. Especially with sharp tools, such as sewing needles, it is important to stay focused so that you do not get hurt. While you may think multi-tasking is time efficient, it is known to be a leading cause of stress. With sewing, your hands and mind are occupied and it is not possible to do another activity while sewing. This allows you to disconnect from work, school, or personal relationships that might be the cause of your stress.

  

Screen_Shot_2016-08-02_at_11.08.45_AM.png

Builds Confidence

            Sewing is a great activity to do whenever you doubt your abilities in work or school. Not only is it a productive way to take a break from other assignments, when you complete your project or learn a new stitch, you will feel more confident. Whether it was a project that has taken you weeks or a small one you did during a one-hour break, the self-esteem boost you get when you complete it will leave you feeling ready to take on new challenges. As you head back to work or school assignments, you can take the confidence gained from sewing and apply it there.

            If you think your child could benefit from the stress-reducing aspects of sewing, The Handwork Studio, a kid’s needle arts, machine sewing, and fashion camp, offer classes year-round. Visit their website or call (610) 660-9600 for more information or to register.

Tags: crafts, creativity, Machine Sewing, Sewing, The Handwork Studio

Sewing: The Perfect Individual or Group Activity

Posted by Libby Foxman on Tue, Sep 27, 2016 @ 11:00 AM

Sewing is a great skill to have whether you want to make your own toys or need to fix up ripped clothes. Depending on what project you are working on, sewing can be a fun group or individual activity. When it is being done as an individual activity, sewing is a great way to relax. The repetitive nature of sewing will give you the opportunity to de-stress from your busy life. However, when sewing with a group, it’s an opportune time to develop teamwork skills while also catching up with friends. Whether you are looking for some alone time to relax or time to catch up with old friends, sewing is the perfect activity.

 Screen_Shot_2016-08-02_at_11.04.00_AM.png

 

Benefits of Sewing As An Individual Activity

            Sewing is a fun activity to do when you are in need of some quiet time. Since there are not many supplies required for hand or machine sewing, it will be easy to gather what you need and find an empty space to work. The alone time you will have while working on your project will give you the opportunity to de-stress from school, work, or personal relationships. Another benefit of sewing by yourself is that you are the only person responsible for the project. You don’t have to worry about working at the same level as an expert sewer; rather you can work at your own level and pace. You also get to pick what you want the project to be. This way you can tailor the project so that it fits your interests, whether that is your favorite colors, movies, or sports. Hand or machine sewing on your own is a great opportunity to further develop your skills, make something that shows your interests, and clear your mind.

Screen_Shot_2016-08-02_at_11.04.07_AM.png 

Benefits of Sewing As A Group Activity

            Sewing can also be the perfect time to catch up with friends. Whether you are each working on your own project or are doing a project together, the repetitive motions of sewing will allow you to complete your projects while also holding a conversation. You can get together with a group of friends to make another a gift, such as a blanket or bag. Participating in a sewing group is also a great way to give back to your community. Your group can make hats for cancer patients or blankets for a homeless shelter. Both of these places will regularly be accepting donations. Look online to find a local hospital or homeless shelter and contact them to find out where you can drop off your projects.

Check out this website to find a sewing group in your area!

If you think you or your child would be interested in learning to sew, The Handwork Studio offers classes for children ages 5-16 through out the year. They also invite adults to inquire about private lessons for themselves or their children. Visit their website or call (610) 660-9600 for more information.

Tags: handwork classes begin, Machine Sewing, machine sewing classes begin, Sewing, The Handwork Studio

3 Unique Birthday Party Ideas

Posted by Libby Foxman on Tue, Sep 13, 2016 @ 11:00 AM

Birthday parties are exciting for everyone involved. For the birthday boy or girl, it is their special day when all of their closest family and friends will come together to celebrate them. For those invited, it’s a fun-filled day with friends, family, games, and dessert. To make your birthday party special, here are some unique ideas that will have everyone excited!

 

Screen_Shot_2016-07-29_at_8.12.35_AM.png 

Cooking Party

            Cooking is a very important skill to have as an adult. If you teach it in a fun way, such as a cooking-themed birthday party, kids will learn to love it! As the kids begin to arrive, you can set them up at a table with paper chef hats that they are able to decorate with markers or stickers. Once everyone has arrived, you can begin cooking the main meal. An easy thing to make is mini pizza. Give each child a small, rolled out piece of dough and put bowls of pizza sauce, cheese, and various toppings in the middle of the table. As those are cooking, you can set out cupcakes for the kids to decorate with frosting and other treats. Through this party, you’ll save yourself the hassle of buying food for the party, while also teaching the kids a great skill.

 

Gardening Party

            For a spring or summer baby, a gardening-themed birthday party is a great way to get kids outside and learning a useful skill. You can set them up at a table with a small pot, planting soil, and a variety of different types of flower seeds. Before they start planting the flower seeds, you can have them paint the pots with puffy paint or glue on jewels. This will allow everyone to put their own unique spin on the flower pots and it will make them easy for parents to identify at the end of the party. Be sure to give the party goers instructions on how to plant and take care of their plant but it wouldn’t hurt to give a written copy to the parents as well. To stick with the theme, have worms and dirt for dessert!

 

Handwork Party

            Handwork parties are great for anytime of year because, no matter the season, there is something to make. Whether you’re sewing, knitting, or weaving, the children can practice their handwork skills while also making a fun project with all of their friends! Before getting started, it will be important to talk the kids through the project, especially if they are working with sharp tools like needles. Once they understand the project, give the party goes enough supplies to make their projects unique. They will love seeing how everyone decorated their projects once they are done. A great birthday party handwork project is party hats. While this video from The Handwork Studio shows party hats for New Year’s, it is also perfect for a birthday celebration! Check out this How-To-Tuesday Video to see how to make it.

 

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            During the school year, The Handwork Studio offers customizable birthday parties. The birthday boy or girl can choose what project they want to make. These include a tote bag, a glamorize your doll dress, bed pockets, or clothes if they do a Fashion and Machine Sewing party. The Handwork Studio also offers embroidery kits, kumi himo kits, or knitting kits to be purchased as party favors. Head to The Handwork Studio’s website to request availability for your child’s birthday party.

Tags: crafts, Kids Birthday Parties, Sewing, The Handwork Studio, Handwork