Purls of Wisdom

Upgrade Your Back-to-School Wardrobe! 10 Fun & Crafty Ways to Upcycle Clothing

Posted by Marjanna Smith on Sun, Sep 02, 2018 @ 10:00 AM

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                      Source: Google Images

Looking for a fun, unique way to be creative with your family? How about a cheap and eco-friendly one? Try upcycling, the perfect combination of originality, creativity, and sustainability for you to try with your kids. Read on to find out what it is and how you can do it at home.

What is Upcycling?

Upcycling is the reuse or repurposing of an old object into a product that is more useful or more beautiful than the original. Upcycling can be super simple and kid-friendly -- for example, instead of throwing out old CDs and magazines, you can make them into mosaic picture frames and woven coasters. It can also be more complex, such as repainting and repairing a piece of furniture instead of kicking it to the curb.

Why is Upcycling Important?

You may be thinking, “Why should I take the time to upcycle? Isn’t recycling good enough?” Well, there are a lot of reasons why upcycling is so important. First, let’s establish the difference between recycling and upcycling. While recycling involves breaking down material to be reused (which decreases the material’s value), upcycling is all about finding new, creative ways to reuse the material (thus increasing its value)! So, like recycling, upcycling reduces the amount of landfill waste you generate; however, upcycling also creates a new product that has a functional and/or decorative use.

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                        Source: Google Images

Next, let’s talk about waste. Remember that helpful catchphrase that everyone uses when talking about how to be more eco-friendly? Reduce, reuse, recycle! Well, I recently learned that these three actions are actually in order of importance. First and foremost, we should make the effort to reduce the amount of things we buy and resources we use (i.e., taking shorter showers and avoiding impulse purchases that we don’t really need). Next is reusing, which includes upcycling! Last is recycling -- so, while it's obviously important to recycle, it is more important to prioritize those first two steps over recycling.  

What Can I Upcycle? Why Should I Upcycle Clothes?

Upcycling can be done with any object or material you can think of -- if you can repurpose, modify, or personalize it, you can upcycle it. For this post, I decided to focus on a popular material of choice for "upcyclers": clothing. Clothing is a great medium for upcycling because it is versatile, available, and can be modified in an infinite number of ways. Clothing is also a big issue when it comes to keeping our planet clean. In 2014, the U.S. alone generated approximately 32.44 billion pounds of textile waste even though 95% of all textiles have the potential to be reused or recycled. This number will only continue to increase unless we raise awareness of this issue and the different ways we can reduce, reuse, and recycle clothing.

Now that you’ve learned how upcycling is an economical, eco-friendly, and creative activity, you must be ready for some inspiration! Whether you have thrift store finds, hand-me-downs, or old clothes of your own, here are 10 different ways you can upcycle them with your kids.

1. Tie-Dye

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Tie-dye is a fun, kid-friendly way to upcycle that never goes out of style. This easy DIY will instantly upgrade any plain, light-colored clothes (and it can camouflage stains). Dye a t-shirt, tank top, skirt, pair of leggings -- or even accessories like headbands or socks! Thinking outside the box is encouraged. Let your kids’ imaginations lead the way as they combine colors and patterns into their own custom work of wearable art. Check out this guide to tie-dye for plenty of tips, tricks, and pattern ideas.

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Don’t have any white clothes laying around? Don’t worry! If you have solid-colored clothing, try tie-dyeing with bleach for a new twist on this classic activity.

2. Freezer Paper Stencil

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Who knew that you could use freezer paper and paint to add a design to a t-shirt? I didn’t until I found this tutorial on how to do it, and it looks as simple and fun as the pictured results.

3. T-Shirt Tote Bag

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Basically all you need to make this tote bag is an old t-shirt, sharp scissors, and 10 minutes. This no-sew project is a great way to repurpose a t-shirt that is too big or no longer worn.

4. Patches, Pins, and Appliques

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Personalize an old hand-me-down (or even cover up stains or holes) by adding some 3D art to your clothes! You can buy patches, pins, and appliques at craft stores and online, or you can make them yourself! See this tutorial for no-sew felt appliques and this tutorial for no-sew fabric flowers. And if you’re up to the challenge, you can try making embroidered patches by hand.

5. Stamped Clothes

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To make your own printed clothing, all you need is a stamp and some paint! You can buy stamps of all kinds at your local craft store, or you can make a quick DIY stamp out of a kitchen sponge, sponge brush, or even a potato! Then simply dip your stamp in acrylic or fabric paint and press it onto any piece of clothing that you want to make 100% cuter.

6.Throw Pillow

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Your child doesn’t have to say goodbye to that beloved t-shirt that has become too small to wear -- preserve it as a throw pillow! Try the no-sew, hand sewed, and machine sewed version depending on your available equipment and skill level. Leave the shirt plain or embellish it with buttons, sequins, fabric stickers, or paint designs! 

7. Unconventional Dye Techniques

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Looking for something different from the average tie-dye or bleach methods? Try using some Elmer’s glue to draw a design or make a pattern with found objects and let the sun do the work!

8. T-Shirt and Tank Top Upgrades

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Cutting up a top is a surprisingly popular DIY project -- and there are sooo many ways to do it. Turn a regular old t-shirt into a cold shoulder top, workout tank, or tie-front tank. Also, don’t hesitate to explore the internet for hundreds of other ideas.

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If you're looking to use an old shirt in a completely new way, you can repurpose t-shirt fabric! From a simple headband to a woven pillow, t-shirt “yarn” has many colorful and practical applications.

9. Peplum Shirt

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Embrace the timeless style of a peplum shape in your upcycling endeavors! Convert an oversized t-shirt into a peplum top or increase the charm (and length!) of a shirt by adding a different colored fabric for a trendy color block effect. While this project can be created through hand sewing, it is also an excellent way to practice and develop basic machine sewing skills.

10. Denim Shorts Upgrades

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Cut an old pair of jeans into shorts and make them stylish using a variety of techniques! This video shows how to do modifications such as adding lace, bleaching, painting, and adding patterned fabric.

 

Have fun with your new, upcycled clothes! And don’t forget to share your upcycling projects with us on Instagram using the hashtag #SewMoreLove so we can see your wonderful creations!

If you and your family is feeling inspired after your adventures in upcycling, make sure to check out The Handwork Studio’s camps and classes so your child can continue to make more handmade art! Our students flourish in our nurturing environment, and we encourage creativity and original projects while developing handwork and needlework techniques for multiple skill levels.

Tags: kids knitting, crafts, kids programs, creativity, imagination, Fall Class, Fall Class Registration, How to Tuesday, fiber arts, teach kids to knit, stitch, embroidery, Machine Sewing, Studio, Fall, Sewing, Knitting, Fun, Teen Fashion Bootcamp, Fashion, kids, fun kids activities, project ideas, activities, camp, Fashion Bootcamp, Fashion & Machine Sewing, Fashion Design, Sewing Machine, Kids' craft class, Gifts, Kids' craft class, tie-dye, Eco Fashion, Upcycling, Inspiration, Kids Activities, Embroidering, sewmorelove, clothes, clothing, blogging, mom blogs, sustainability, DIY projects, t shirt DIYs, repurpose clothes, eco friendly, DIY, thrifting, back-to-school, blog, craft blogs, tutorial, upcycle, sustainable fashion, kids DIYs, DIY ideas, t shirt pillow

Crocheting: How It Is Different from Knitting, and Why You Should Try It This Summer!

Posted by Cameron Lee on Sun, Jul 15, 2018 @ 10:00 AM

So you’ve decided to try out handwork with your kids this summer, but you can’t choose between knitting and crocheting. What are the differences? Which is easier? Do they both offer the health benefits that we discovered knitting helps with in our last blog post? If you were never taught the difference between the two, it can be daunting to figure out how to start. You may have a family member that knits or crochets, but you’re not quite sure what goes into the different processes, and you’ve never thought to ask them why they prefer one form of the craft over the other. In this post we’ll explore the history of crocheting together, talk about the differences (and similarities!) between knitting and crocheting, and help you figure out which of the two you’d rather learn first! (If neither seem right for you, check out this blog post on kumihimo, a form of Japanese braiding, and an awesome summer activity for your kids.)Hands crocheting with blue yarn and crochet hook

Crocheting, or the process of making “a piece of needlework by looping thread with a hooked needle,” has history in many countries around the world. A lot less is known about the origins of crocheting than knitting, but some researchers believe that the art originated in Arabia and traveled around the world via Arab trade routes, while others believe crocheting was born in South America or China. Even though the history of crocheting is not very well documented, its role in the world has been very important! After the Irish potato famine in the mid 1800s, for example, families survived on money they made from selling their crochet projects, and when millions of Irish people immigrated to America to escape the famine, they brought crocheting with them.

Early crochet projects were made using anything from hair to grass to animal fur as yarn, and animal bone, horns, old spoons, and wood served as substitutes for the crochet hooks used today. One of the main uses of crocheting in 16th century Europe, for example, was to imitate the fashionable lace that wealthier people could afford, but that people of the lower classes couldn’t. Nowadays people crochet afghans, blankets, scarves, hats, shawls, socks, tote bags, and more!

Now that I’ve told you all about crocheting and knitting, it’s time to learn about the similarities and differences between the two so you can pick which to try first! Both crocheting and knitting can be done by following patterns and you can make mostly the same projects using either technique. They require similar sets of skills - hand-eye coordination, patience, determination to see a project through to the end - and because of this, crocheting offers many of the same health benefits as knitting.

Crocheting and knitting, on the other hand, don’t use all of the same supplies. Instead of using two needles like you do when you hand knit, crocheting is done with a single hook. Although there are knitting machines that help mass produce clothes, no machine has yet been invented that properly mimics crochet stitches, so almost all crocheting is done by hand.  

There is no simple answer to which process is easier: some people find crocheting more natural to pick up and others think knitting is less difficult. Because you can make very similar projects with knitting and crocheting, whether you wish to create a blanket or a hat shouldn’t stop you from exploring one or the other. If you want to help teach your child how to knit, check out our last blog post for some amazing resources on getting started!

Crochet hook and purple yarnIf you wish to try crocheting, you have many options for how to begin! You can send your kids to one of The Handwork Studio’s summer camps where they can learn all sorts of crafts, or you can check out The Handwork Studio’s YouTube tutorial on how to get started crocheting and learn right alongside your kids. No matter which technique you choose to learn and how you decide to explore it, The Handwork Studio will be right by your side with resources and guidance.

If you and your child work on projects that you want to share, post a picture on Instagram with the hashtag #SewMoreLove! We would love to see what you and your young crafters create this summer!

Tags: Knitting, Crochet, Fun, Summer, Handwork, Inspiration, Kids Activities, Crocheting

Knitting: A Fun Summer Activity That’s Also Good for Your Health

Posted by Cameron Lee on Tue, Jul 10, 2018 @ 05:15 PM

Do you ever notice that your child is feeling stress, helplessness, or anxiety? Whether they are caused by school, work, or other daily worries, these negative emotions can sometimes get overwhelming. Everyone has their way of dealing with them, from bubble baths to relaxing yoga to playing sports, but there’s one method of helping eliminate this negativity from your kids’ lives that is a bit more unconventional: Knitting. 

 Stock photo of knitting needles and yarn

Hear me out! Knitting, a process that involves the repeated interlocking of loops of yarn using needles, has been around since the 5th century and spread from the Middle East to Europe to all over the world. People everywhere learned to make sweaters, scarves, socks, and all sorts of things with this handheld craft, and eventually, it became so popular that machines had to be invented to make the process faster. Its popularity only grew and spread with the recent resurgence of handmade knitting, and now it is popular amongst people of all ages!

Knitters and scientists alike have conducted studies, experiments, and research all to figure out if knitting has health benefits, and they discovered some amazing things. One study shows that knitting can “reduce chronic pain, boost mood, reduce stress, treat panic attacks...boost confidence,” and more. The repetitive movements, hand positions, and mental stimulation of knitting can help cheer you up and make you feel safe, and feeling the soft yarn can soothe you and calm you down.

Child (boy) smiling with Wonder Knitter

Another study finds that knitting can prompt your brain to release serotonin, a chemical that affects your mood, and it can also lower your heart rate by 11 beats per minute, creating a sense of calm similar to what you feel when you practice yoga. Knitting is different than yoga, playing music, and other calming activities, however, because research speculates that crafting encourages neural pathways in your brain to stay healthy. This means that knitting can help your brain stay strong as you age, and lessen the chance of memory loss and cognitive impairments.

In addition to being great for your health, knitting is an fantastic skill to learn both for personal gain and to combat loneliness. When you or your child finishes a knitting project, you get to wear your hat or scarf or socks knowing that you made them, or give them to someone else knowing that you gave them something unique that no one else could have done the same. When you are on the bus, or in a car, or in a waiting room, knitting is an amazing conversation starter, in addition to helping you feel productive and pass the time. You and your child can also make friends because of knitting! You could join a knitting club, or attend The Handwork Studio’s classes or camps, and unite with others around a shared love for the craft.Two children (girls) smiling with knitting projects

Whether you or your kids wish to start a new activity, make some friends, strengthen your brain, or simply feel good, knitting is a great solution. You and your child can even improve your bond by learning to knit together by getting your own knitting materials and watching The Handwork Studio’s knitting tutorials. If you are stuck on how to approach teaching your child to knit, check out this article for some tips and tricks to make the process as seamless and happy as possible. Summer is also a great time to try something new, acquire a fun, useful skill, and make memories that your family will cherish forever!

 Two children (girls) smiling with Wonder Knitters

 

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Image 1: Stock photo of knitting needles and yarn
Image 2: Child smiling with Wonder Knitter
Image 3: Two children smiling with knitting projects
Image 4: Two children smiling with Wonder Knitters

 

 

 

Tags: Summer Camp, Knitting, Fun, Summer, Handwork, Inspiration, Kids Activities, Health Benefits, Health

Maker Monday: Little Bags.Big Impact's Anna Welsh

Posted by Kelsey Underwood on Mon, Jul 03, 2017 @ 11:00 AM

Profile

Name: Anna Welsh

Age: 12

Company: little bags. BIG IMPACT

Achievements: 2017 Young Entrepreneur of the Year & 2017 Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA!) Saunders Scholarship Competition Semi-finalist  

Website: http://www.littlebagsbigimpact.com/

Bio: Anna Welsh, a sixth grader from the philadelphia area, has a passion for sewing, learning and protecting the environment. As a result, she founded little bags. Big Impact, a company that sells handcrafted clutch bags created from resourced vintage materials. Fifteen percent of each sale goes to Tree House Books, an organization dedicated to improving child literacy and education in the North Philadelphia area.

Big Discovery

At the age of six, Anna began taking handwork classes at The Handwork Studio, where she discovered her talent and love for sewing. She graduated to machine sewing classes at the age of 11.

“These eye-openers early on inspired me to incorporate handcrafts and other handmade materials into my everyday life,” she said.

Now, little bags. Big Impact allows Anna to continue and share her passion for sewing and helping others.

Little Materials

Anna finds the fabric for her little bags at various organizations that collect scraps from warehouse closings and local donations. 

“I have been fortunate to incorporate all of these fabric scraps into my little bags,” she said. 

Another unique touch Anna incorporates in her clutches is a zipper charm. The charms vary from tassels, to beads, to recycled earrings! 

Big Inspiration

Anna said she is always inspired to create new pieces for her collection. She often finds inspiration from her conversations with others.

“Just having a conversation with someone can change your mindset, thinking, and motivation,” she said. “Sometimes, I find myself daydreaming about how I can take an idea someone gave to me and incorporate it into my business and personal crafts.”

She also finds inspiration from reading magazines, newspapers, and books. Sometimes Anna reads a whole article; other times merely a picture strikes an idea.

Other inspirations include businesses, entrepreneurs, Instagram, and giving back to her community. Her passion for education and reading is what inspired her company’s contribution to Tree House Books.

Big Pride

Anna is most proud of the polar bear project she knitted at the age of seven. She uses the bear as a reminded of her perseverance and hardwork.

“Yeah—the eyes may be crooked and there are endless holes, but it gives me joy and pleasure just knowing that I created that piece and it is actually holding together,” she said.

Anna is also proud of her Young Entrepreneur of the Year award from the Philadelphia Center for Advancing Entrepreneurs and the National Association of Women Business Owners - Philadelphia Chapter, which she received this month (your Handwork Studio family is proud of you too, Anna!).

Facing Big Obstacles

Anna said, she has encountered obstacles when creating pieces. Her solution: talk it out with Miss Meredith at The Handwork Studio.

“I am thankful for Miss Meredith from the Handwork Studio to help me out,” Anna said. “She’s amazing and has a creative solution for everything.”

Big Advice

As for advice to future entrepreneurs and designers, Anna said, “You have to be committed and be willing to take risks. There may be long nights and you may get frustrated. However, if you are creating something you love, it will all be worth it!”


 Be sure to check back every week to meet another amazing maker!

Want your children to learn and be inspired in the same classes that jumpstarted Anna's passion for sewing and fashion? You can find our summer camp programs here. For project ideas join our YouTube Channel or visit our Store.

#TheHandworkStudio #Narthberth #SummerCamp #HandworkandMachineSewing #FashionandMachineSewing #Knitting #KidsCanSew #littlebagsBIGIMPACT #TreeHouseBooks
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Tags: Design, Classes, Narberth, Knitting, Fashion, Fashion & Machine Sewing, Eco Fashion

Maker Monday: NYC City Fashion Designer Lizzy Gee

Posted by Kelsey Underwood on Mon, Jun 19, 2017 @ 11:00 AM

http://www.lizzygee.com/

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Name: Lizzy Gee

Age: 21

School: Pratt Institute

Studio Location: Brooklyn, NY

Website: http://www.lizzygee.com/

Bio: Lizzy Gee, a rising senior fashion design student at Pratt Institute, has been creating as long as she can remember. She discovered fashion design at The Handwork Studio at the age of eight.

 

 

Fashion Design

Lizzy describes fashion in two words: “wearable art.”

“I discovered fashion design was my favorite form of creating since it combines function and art,” she said.

A comprehensive process, fashion design involves numerous skills to transform sketches into fashion pieces that speak the creator’s vision.

“There's illustration, digital illustration, technical drawing, print design, machine sewing, hand sewing, and so on,” Lizzy said. “Some designers are better at certain stages of the process, compared to others, which helps to differentiate their aesthetic (from other designers).” 

Design Inspiration

Personal experiences and interests inspire Lizzy’s fashion design concepts.

“Anything can possibly inspire me, but overall beauty, love, and humor are the main elements where I find inspiration,” Lizzy said.  

Unique mixes of these elements generate Lizzy’s brilliant ideas--typically involving a story--that she then tells through her designs.

Top DesignLizzy Gee Romper

Lizzy takes most pride in her Rainbow Ruination Romper. 

“It combines much of what I try to achieve through concept and function,” she said. “I designed all textiles as well as the silhouette to show the colorful pollution that is hurting our environment by creating textile patterns with my photography and a silhouette that references hazmat suits used for environmental cleanup.”    

In addition to telling an environmental message, the entirely organic romper provides functional sustainability through the bodice’s ability to transform into various styles. 

Design Challenges   

Lizzy Gee DesignLizzy believes challenges are part of the fashion designer job description.

“Part of the fun with design is to challenge my craft in order to improve,” she said. “I love designing for people in all walks of life, so, in order to see how my ideas transcend different body types and occasions, I must research and plan my design in order to avoid issues once gone on to construct.”     

One of Lizzy’s most recent capsule collections consisted of menswear pieces, new territory for the designer who typically constructs unixsex or womenswear.  

“Even though I was much more anxious to combine my style with menswear, after researching to solidify my line up and creating samples of the garments to fit on the model, the collection came together,” Lizzy said. “I felt even more satisfied with the final product by having overcome the obstacles.”

Everyday Design

Living in an exciting place like Brooklyn, Lizzy has inspiration and ideas constantly around her. She captures all her findings with her camera and files them at her studio.

“I am lucky to have found a profession I love to do even in my free time,”she said. “ I can have a drink with a mini-umbrella, put on a playlist, and sketch new designs anywhere I go."

Design Advice

Lizzy Gee 3.jpegWhen it comes to advice for future fashion designers, Lizzy said, “Try not to listen to others expectations or judgments until you have listened to your own. If what you dream is less practical, you can make it practical by showing the world it can be done. Take every opportunity that has the potential to help you achieve your dream. It may not happen overnight, but determination is what builds your dreams. And most importantly, have a ton of fun!”


Be sure to check back every week to meet another amazing maker!

Want your children to learn and be inspired in the same classes that jumpstarted Lizzy's passion for sewing and fashion? You can find our fall classes here. For project ideas join our You Tube Channel or visit our Store.

#TheHandworkStudio #Narthberth #FallSession #HandworkandMachineSewing #FashionandMachineSewing #DesignStudio #KnittingStudio #HomeschoolerClasses #KidsCanSew # Workshops #BirthdayParties #Pratt 

 

 

 

Tags: kids art classes in narberth pennsylvania, Kids Birthday Parties, Fall Class, Fall Class Registration, Machine Sewing, Design, machine sewing classes begin, Classes, Fall, Open Design Studio, Narberth, Knitting, Fashion, The Handwork Studio, Fashion & Machine Sewing, Sewing Machine, Narberth kids' activities, Philadelphia, Narberth, PA

3 Ways To Avoid Boredom on Winter Break Trips

Posted by Libby Foxman on Tue, Nov 01, 2016 @ 11:00 AM

3 Ways To Avoid Boredom on Winter Break Trips

            As thanksgiving and winter break approaches, it is time to start planning for long road trips or plane rides to visit family. With the dreaded question of “are we there yet?” looming, we have compiled a small list of ways to keep your kids occupied on those journeys. Not only will these activities keep your kids busy but they can learn and practice important skills.

 

Movie Sing-A-Long

A great way to pass the time is to have a movie sing-a-long. A lot of Disney movies sell versions that display the song lyrics so your children can sing-a-long to their favorite movie. This is also a great way for young children to practice their reading skills. Since they mostly know the words to the songs, they will be able to associate the words they are singing to the words on the screen. The excitement of this activity will also tire them out so you can enjoy some quiet time after all of that singing. 

 

Car Games

            An easy way to pass the time on a car trip, without needing to bring anything along, is the License Plate Game. As you are driving, see if your kids can find the license plates of as many different states as possible. Obviously, if you are on the east coast, chances are pretty slim that you will find a Hawaii or Alaska license plate but your kids will be so excited about every new state they find. Like the movie sing-a-long, the license plate game is also a great way for your children to practice their reading.

 

Knitting

            Knitting is a great activity to do while traveling because not a lot of materials are needed and the ones that are, are small and portable. All that is needed are knitting needles and yarn. In the same time that it takes to get to your destination, whether that is by car, train, or plane, your child will get a good start on their knitting project. They can also continue with their projects during their down time over the break. By the end of the holiday break, your child could have a new hat or mittens for school!

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            If your family is home for winter break, The Handwork Studio offers Winter Break Camp. During this one-week camp, campers will be introduced to practical handwork arts such as hand and machine sewing, weaving, and knitting. If you think your child would be interested in this fun winter break camp, head to The Handwork Studio’s website or call (610) 660-9600 to register.

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Tags: kids knitting, knitting classes begin, Knitting, The Handwork Studio, Winter Camp

Counselor Spotlight

Posted by Libby Foxman on Tue, Aug 16, 2016 @ 11:00 AM

The Handwork Studio employs creative and passionate people every year. These people are often artists, teachers, students, or anyone with an interest in helping children develop amazing handwork skills that kids will find useful in every aspect of their lives. Miss Caelie is a first year junior counselor but has been a part of The Handwork Studio family for many years.

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            Before Miss Caelie was a counselor at The Handwork Studio, she had been a camper for many years. Like many of the campers we have at The Handwork Studio, when she started, she did not have previous experience with any of the techniques. She is now a junior counselor, teaching all new and old campers how to sew, knit, weave, and more. She loves the sense of community that is present at The Handwork Studio. Everyone is supportive of one another and all hold similar passions.

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            At The Handwork Studio’s Narberth location, Miss Caelie assists the lead instructor, Miss Alyssa, at Handwork Day Camp. Handwork Day Camp is for children aged 5 to 12. At this program, campers get an introduction to hand and machine sewing, knitting, weaving, and wet felting. Miss Caelie’s favorite project at Handwork Day Camp is the stuffed owl. Campers cut out a stencil of an owl, stuff it, and hand sew it together. They also get to decorate their own project with needle felting. The introduction to these techniques will allow campers to successfully go onto The Handwork Studio’s other camps, including Fashion and Machine Sewing, Glamorize Your Doll, Sew Tech, and Fashion Boot Camp.

            When Miss Caelie is not at The Handwork Studio she loves acting and reading. Like the work done at The Handwork Studio, these two activities provide Miss Caelie with a creative and relaxing outlet. Miss Caelie is going to begin her sophomore year of college this fall where she is pursuing a degree in science. While she plans to get her PhD before settling into a career, she hopes to be a science teacher and thinks that her time working at The Handwork Studio will help her discover her teaching style and give her the confidence to continue on this career path. The campers at The Handwork Studio are very well supported by counselors, like Miss Caelie. They are constantly encouraging campers to challenge themselves and help them with whatever they need.
           If you are interested in The Handwork Studio as a place for your child to learn useful handwork skills from great counselors like Miss Caelie, head to our website to register.

Tags: Handwork Day Camp, Summer Camp, Sewing, Knitting, The Handwork Studio, miss caelie

4 Projects to Get Ready For Summer

Posted by Libby Foxman on Tue, Jun 21, 2016 @ 11:00 AM


As the weather continues to heat up, we know that summer is here and with that comes a whole handful of preparations to make sure that your kids are ready for the beach, camp and whatever else you have planned. Here a 4 fun ways to get your kids ready the summer:

 

Tie-Dye Your Own Beach Towel:

            Rather than going out to buy brand new beach towels that you threw away last summer, find an old white one (or even some old bed sheets) in your linen closet and tie-dye it! You can roll up the towels however you want and tie it up into sections with rubber bands. Once that is done, get your tie-dye ready – it is probably easier to buy some at a store but there are ways to make your own using food coloring. Now that everything is prepped, put on your gloves and you can start tie dying by squeezing the dye into the each section of the towel! Make it as colorful and crazy as you want but be sure to let it dry for 6-8 hours before untying it and rinsing it off with a hose.

 

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Make a Pillowcase:

            When going away to sleep away camp, its always comforting to bring something personal from home. A great project to do with your camper before they leave for the summer is to make a pillowcase. All you need is two pieces of fabric, needle, thread, and whatever you want to use to decorate your pillowcase. The fabric can come from an old blanket or you can buy it at your local crafts store. To make the pillowcase, measure out the two pieces fabric to be the same size – or a little bit bigger- than your pillow. With your needle and thread, sew three sides of the pillowcase together, leaving one opening at the top for the pillow to fit into. Now that your pillowcase is made, you can decorate it by sewing on other patches of fabric or get iron-on patches. This is a great way to send your kid off to sleep away camp with a little bit of home.

 

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Decorate Your Backpack:

            At summer camp, whether it is sleep away or day camp, campers’ bags usually get thrown in with everyone else’s. So what better way to make your camper’s bag stand out than by decorating it with some patchwork? This is very easy to do and you hardly need to buy anything! You can use the same backpack from the school year and some old t-shirts or blankets. Along with these supplies, you’ll need a sewing needle and thread. Cut up your old t-shirts and blankets into shapes or letters and then sew them directly onto your backpack. This is a great project to get your kid ready and excited for camp this summer!

 

Make Your Own Sleeping Mask:

            A camper’s bunk at sleep away camp is usually nothing like their bedroom at home. They will probably be in a cabin with the rest of their age group who might be using night-lights and flashlights late into the night. A great project to do before they leave for camp is to make their own sleep mask. It will be a thoughtful reminder of home and help make the night a bit more peaceful. All you’ll need is two pieces of fabric, a piece of elastic, and two cut outs shaped like you mask and then you are ready to sew it all together either with a sewing machine or by hand. Click the image of the sleeping mask to be linked to The Handwork Studio’s How-To-Tuesday video to get a step-by-step tutorial on how to make your own!

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If your child has an interest in sewing, design, or any other handwork crafts, go to The Handwork Studio website for our fall and summer camp schedule and live chat with Miss Catalina or call 610.660.9600 to see what would be best for your camper!

Tags: How to Tuesday, Summer Camp, Sewing, Knitting, The Handwork Studio, Summer, fun kids activities, activities, camp, Handwork, tie-dye

Get Started With Knitting by Casting On

Posted by Megan DiFeo on Thu, Oct 08, 2015 @ 11:39 AM



Are you ready to start knitting?

Maybe your friend knits, or you child has learned to knit with us at the studio. No matter where you find yourself on your creative journey, learning to knit can be a fun and relaxing way to stay creative. But first, you need to learn how to get started!  

Check out our video on how to cast on which is the first and fundamental step in knitting.


Tags: kids knitting, Knitting

Craft Yarn Council Launches #StitchAwayStress Campaign

Posted by Megan DiFeo on Thu, May 14, 2015 @ 09:59 AM

Stitch Away StressIt's no secret that we love teaching kids how to knit and crochet.  We've been hearing it in recent months about the therapeutic affects that knitting and crochet have on humans. The Craft Yarn Council has launched a month long campaign to spread awareness of the mood boosting effects on the human body during National Stress Awareness month.

 

They'll be sharing projects and fun ways to use these craft techniques to live a more stress-free life.   Be sure to follow them throughout April on their InstagramFacebookPinterest and Twitter pages. You can also enter to win great giveaways and share your stories about how knitting or crochet has changed your life.




 

 

We see the positive effects of knitting and crochet all year round. Children and adults alike are able to relax, focus and create a sense of accomplishment and peace working through their projects.  Be sure to hop over and read the full details of the campaign here.

Tags: Knitting, Crochet, Craft Yarn Council, Campaign