Purls of Wisdom

Crocheting: How It Is Different from Knitting, and Why You Should Try It This Summer!

Posted by Cameron Lee on Sun, Jul 15, 2018 @ 10:00 AM

So you’ve decided to try out handwork with your kids this summer, but you can’t choose between knitting and crocheting. What are the differences? Which is easier? Do they both offer the health benefits that we discovered knitting helps with in our last blog post? If you were never taught the difference between the two, it can be daunting to figure out how to start. You may have a family member that knits or crochets, but you’re not quite sure what goes into the different processes, and you’ve never thought to ask them why they prefer one form of the craft over the other. In this post we’ll explore the history of crocheting together, talk about the differences (and similarities!) between knitting and crocheting, and help you figure out which of the two you’d rather learn first! (If neither seem right for you, check out this blog post on kumihimo, a form of Japanese braiding, and an awesome summer activity for your kids.)Hands crocheting with blue yarn and crochet hook

Crocheting, or the process of making “a piece of needlework by looping thread with a hooked needle,” has history in many countries around the world. A lot less is known about the origins of crocheting than knitting, but some researchers believe that the art originated in Arabia and traveled around the world via Arab trade routes, while others believe crocheting was born in South America or China. Even though the history of crocheting is not very well documented, its role in the world has been very important! After the Irish potato famine in the mid 1800s, for example, families survived on money they made from selling their crochet projects, and when millions of Irish people immigrated to America to escape the famine, they brought crocheting with them.

Early crochet projects were made using anything from hair to grass to animal fur as yarn, and animal bone, horns, old spoons, and wood served as substitutes for the crochet hooks used today. One of the main uses of crocheting in 16th century Europe, for example, was to imitate the fashionable lace that wealthier people could afford, but that people of the lower classes couldn’t. Nowadays people crochet afghans, blankets, scarves, hats, shawls, socks, tote bags, and more!

Now that I’ve told you all about crocheting and knitting, it’s time to learn about the similarities and differences between the two so you can pick which to try first! Both crocheting and knitting can be done by following patterns and you can make mostly the same projects using either technique. They require similar sets of skills - hand-eye coordination, patience, determination to see a project through to the end - and because of this, crocheting offers many of the same health benefits as knitting.

Crocheting and knitting, on the other hand, don’t use all of the same supplies. Instead of using two needles like you do when you hand knit, crocheting is done with a single hook. Although there are knitting machines that help mass produce clothes, no machine has yet been invented that properly mimics crochet stitches, so almost all crocheting is done by hand.  

There is no simple answer to which process is easier: some people find crocheting more natural to pick up and others think knitting is less difficult. Because you can make very similar projects with knitting and crocheting, whether you wish to create a blanket or a hat shouldn’t stop you from exploring one or the other. If you want to help teach your child how to knit, check out our last blog post for some amazing resources on getting started!

Crochet hook and purple yarnIf you wish to try crocheting, you have many options for how to begin! You can send your kids to one of The Handwork Studio’s summer camps where they can learn all sorts of crafts, or you can check out The Handwork Studio’s YouTube tutorial on how to get started crocheting and learn right alongside your kids. No matter which technique you choose to learn and how you decide to explore it, The Handwork Studio will be right by your side with resources and guidance.

If you and your child work on projects that you want to share, post a picture on Instagram with the hashtag #SewMoreLove! We would love to see what you and your young crafters create this summer!

Tags: Knitting, Crochet, Fun, Summer, Handwork, Inspiration, Kids Activities, Crocheting

Knitting: A Fun Summer Activity That’s Also Good for Your Health

Posted by Cameron Lee on Tue, Jul 10, 2018 @ 05:15 PM

Do you ever notice that your child is feeling stress, helplessness, or anxiety? Whether they are caused by school, work, or other daily worries, these negative emotions can sometimes get overwhelming. Everyone has their way of dealing with them, from bubble baths to relaxing yoga to playing sports, but there’s one method of helping eliminate this negativity from your kids’ lives that is a bit more unconventional: Knitting. 

 Stock photo of knitting needles and yarn

Hear me out! Knitting, a process that involves the repeated interlocking of loops of yarn using needles, has been around since the 5th century and spread from the Middle East to Europe to all over the world. People everywhere learned to make sweaters, scarves, socks, and all sorts of things with this handheld craft, and eventually, it became so popular that machines had to be invented to make the process faster. Its popularity only grew and spread with the recent resurgence of handmade knitting, and now it is popular amongst people of all ages!

Knitters and scientists alike have conducted studies, experiments, and research all to figure out if knitting has health benefits, and they discovered some amazing things. One study shows that knitting can “reduce chronic pain, boost mood, reduce stress, treat panic attacks...boost confidence,” and more. The repetitive movements, hand positions, and mental stimulation of knitting can help cheer you up and make you feel safe, and feeling the soft yarn can soothe you and calm you down.

Child (boy) smiling with Wonder Knitter

Another study finds that knitting can prompt your brain to release serotonin, a chemical that affects your mood, and it can also lower your heart rate by 11 beats per minute, creating a sense of calm similar to what you feel when you practice yoga. Knitting is different than yoga, playing music, and other calming activities, however, because research speculates that crafting encourages neural pathways in your brain to stay healthy. This means that knitting can help your brain stay strong as you age, and lessen the chance of memory loss and cognitive impairments.

In addition to being great for your health, knitting is an fantastic skill to learn both for personal gain and to combat loneliness. When you or your child finishes a knitting project, you get to wear your hat or scarf or socks knowing that you made them, or give them to someone else knowing that you gave them something unique that no one else could have done the same. When you are on the bus, or in a car, or in a waiting room, knitting is an amazing conversation starter, in addition to helping you feel productive and pass the time. You and your child can also make friends because of knitting! You could join a knitting club, or attend The Handwork Studio’s classes or camps, and unite with others around a shared love for the craft.Two children (girls) smiling with knitting projects

Whether you or your kids wish to start a new activity, make some friends, strengthen your brain, or simply feel good, knitting is a great solution. You and your child can even improve your bond by learning to knit together by getting your own knitting materials and watching The Handwork Studio’s knitting tutorials. If you are stuck on how to approach teaching your child to knit, check out this article for some tips and tricks to make the process as seamless and happy as possible. Summer is also a great time to try something new, acquire a fun, useful skill, and make memories that your family will cherish forever!

 Two children (girls) smiling with Wonder Knitters

 

Image Descriptions
Image 1: Stock photo of knitting needles and yarn
Image 2: Child smiling with Wonder Knitter
Image 3: Two children smiling with knitting projects
Image 4: Two children smiling with Wonder Knitters

 

 

 

Tags: Summer Camp, Knitting, Fun, Summer, Handwork, Inspiration, Kids Activities, Health Benefits, Health

Summer: Let Kids Relax and Get in the Flow with Ancient Japanese Braiding

Posted by Cameron Lee on Sun, Jul 01, 2018 @ 10:06 AM

Another school year ends, and another summer begins. Suddenly kids are hanging around the house without the daily routine of school and after-school activities, and they may complain that it is too sunny and hot to go outside. Everyone has experienced this phenomenon, whether you are a parent or a kid yourself, and it is easy for kids to get stuck in the endless cycle of sitting in front of the TV in the air-conditioned family room all day, eating snacks and losing all that fantastic free time they were so highly anticipating while still in school.

So many kids spend too much time watching TV or on their phones, letting some of the greatest joys of this time of year pass them by. Having so much time on your hands can seem like a negative when you’re not sure what to fill it with, and although electronics and screen time are a child’s first go to, they can quickly become overused, and prevent kids from participating in activities that they don’t have time to explore during the school year.

This doesn’t necessarily mean that kids should be immersed in activities the first day after school ends - nobody wants to go from the stress and strict routine of school to another strict routine. Summer should be a time for kids to alleviate stress, learn something new, and find tColorful marudai kumihimo braidsheir flowengaging in an activity or passion for which they have so much love that they don’t even notice the time passing.

Being in flow, or experiencing that sense of overwhelming joy that comes from doing something you are really passionate about, is something we don’t incorporate enough in our daily lives, but that can easily be remedied. Activities like kumihimo, an ancient form of Japanese braiding, can help kids find their flow, learn something new, help with fine motor skills, and forget all about that summer slump. Kumihimo dates back well over a thousand years and was traditionally used by Samurai warriors to hold their armor together and provide a grip on their sword hilts. It was even used to prevent tea from being poisoned!

Although handmade kumihimo became less popular over the years as Japanese braiders invented machines to do the braiding, the art is still practiced in Japan (and all over the world) today. People still use kumihimo braids to tie down the wide sashes called obi that go on kimonos and to tie their haori jackets. At the same time, people like Martha Stewart are featuring kumihimo in their magazines and blogs, explaining how to use a kumihimo disc, the modern version of the traditional marudai and takadai stands used to create the braids. 

Kumihimo braid bracelets

Kids can even learn how to do kumihimo themselves through The Handwork Studio’s YouTube channel and at our summer camps. Summer is a time for kids to challenge themselves to try new things and learn new, fun skills, and kumihimo is a great place to start. It is educational, engaging, and kids become a part of an ancient history of Japanese braid-making when they try their hands at the art. Kumihimo braids can be used for all sorts of awesome things like shoelaces, bracelets, necklaces, and bookmarks, and it

Kumihimo braiding discwill feel great for your kids to be able to wear or use something they made. Once they become a master at the braiding technique, they can even try out more complicated and colorful patterns!

So, once again, if your kids are bored at home, watching too much TV and stuck in ruts, you should encourage them to learn kumihimo. Whether they try it on their own by ordering some of our kumihimo materials and following a YouTube tutorial or come to one of The Handwork Studio’s many locations and participate in our summer camps, your kids will find passion in kumihimo, find their flow, and make the most of their summer! 






 

Tags: Kumihimo, Summer Camp, Kids Camp, Fun, Summer, Handwork, Inspiration, Kids Activities

3 Unique Birthday Party Ideas

Posted by Libby Foxman on Tue, Sep 13, 2016 @ 11:00 AM

Birthday parties are exciting for everyone involved. For the birthday boy or girl, it is their special day when all of their closest family and friends will come together to celebrate them. For those invited, it’s a fun-filled day with friends, family, games, and dessert. To make your birthday party special, here are some unique ideas that will have everyone excited!

 

Screen_Shot_2016-07-29_at_8.12.35_AM.png 

Cooking Party

            Cooking is a very important skill to have as an adult. If you teach it in a fun way, such as a cooking-themed birthday party, kids will learn to love it! As the kids begin to arrive, you can set them up at a table with paper chef hats that they are able to decorate with markers or stickers. Once everyone has arrived, you can begin cooking the main meal. An easy thing to make is mini pizza. Give each child a small, rolled out piece of dough and put bowls of pizza sauce, cheese, and various toppings in the middle of the table. As those are cooking, you can set out cupcakes for the kids to decorate with frosting and other treats. Through this party, you’ll save yourself the hassle of buying food for the party, while also teaching the kids a great skill.

 

Gardening Party

            For a spring or summer baby, a gardening-themed birthday party is a great way to get kids outside and learning a useful skill. You can set them up at a table with a small pot, planting soil, and a variety of different types of flower seeds. Before they start planting the flower seeds, you can have them paint the pots with puffy paint or glue on jewels. This will allow everyone to put their own unique spin on the flower pots and it will make them easy for parents to identify at the end of the party. Be sure to give the party goers instructions on how to plant and take care of their plant but it wouldn’t hurt to give a written copy to the parents as well. To stick with the theme, have worms and dirt for dessert!

 

Handwork Party

            Handwork parties are great for anytime of year because, no matter the season, there is something to make. Whether you’re sewing, knitting, or weaving, the children can practice their handwork skills while also making a fun project with all of their friends! Before getting started, it will be important to talk the kids through the project, especially if they are working with sharp tools like needles. Once they understand the project, give the party goes enough supplies to make their projects unique. They will love seeing how everyone decorated their projects once they are done. A great birthday party handwork project is party hats. While this video from The Handwork Studio shows party hats for New Year’s, it is also perfect for a birthday celebration! Check out this How-To-Tuesday Video to see how to make it.

 

 Screen_Shot_2016-07-29_at_8.11.15_AM.png

 

            During the school year, The Handwork Studio offers customizable birthday parties. The birthday boy or girl can choose what project they want to make. These include a tote bag, a glamorize your doll dress, bed pockets, or clothes if they do a Fashion and Machine Sewing party. The Handwork Studio also offers embroidery kits, kumi himo kits, or knitting kits to be purchased as party favors. Head to The Handwork Studio’s website to request availability for your child’s birthday party.

Tags: crafts, Kids Birthday Parties, Sewing, The Handwork Studio, Handwork

Why summer is the perfect opportunity to learn things you don't in school:

Posted by Libby Foxman on Tue, Jul 12, 2016 @ 11:00 AM

Through out the school year, students are required to follow a set curriculum. They will cover math, english, science, history, art, and P.E. during the day and with afternoons focused on homework, there is little time to dedicate to learning something new. Whether that is sports, arts, theatre, or cooking, in the summer children have the free time needed to devote to life-enriching activities. Summer is a great time for your child to learn things that they don’t have the opportunity to learn during the school year.

 Screen_Shot_2016-07-07_at_8.56.41_AM.png

 

Plenty of Free Time

            Spending the entire day at school and usually a few hours in the afternoon doing homework and participating in a sport, it’s hard to find the time to pick up a new hobby. However, with summer comes a lot of free time that can be dedicated to picking up a new hobby. Besides going to camp during the day, children have the opportunity to take advantage of their free time to pick up a new activity. Whether they are interested in art, cooking, or learning a new language, it is easy to schedule in time either on the Internet, at camp, or in books.

 

Warm Weather Puts You In A Better Mood

            There are many studies that prove good weather improves your mood. So, what better time to learn something new than when you’re feeling good? Trying something new is always nerve-wracking. You don’t know if you will be good at it or if you will like it but with a positive attitude due to the warm weather, you will be more open to giving it a try. This will keep you optimistic when it gets difficult and you get frustrated. Keeping a positive attitude when trying something new is extremely important. It will encourage you to not give up and look on the bright side even when you are feeling discouraged.

 

Screen_Shot_2016-07-07_at_8.56.52_AM.png 

Stress Free Environment

            Summer is a time to have fun! There are no tests, quizzes, or homework to worry about so taking the time during the summer to learn something new should be stress free. If you can, get outside to do your new activity. The fresh air will inspire and increase creativity. It is also important to only focus on learning one new thing at a time. Besides the fact that you need to focus on the new activity if you want a genuine understanding of it, multi-tasking is also a big cause of stress. If you take the time to dedicate your focus to one activity at a time, not only will you be better at it, but you will also be able to enjoy it more. Take advantage of your stress free summer by learning a new activity and possibly finding a new passion.

 

Screen_Shot_2016-07-07_at_8.57.00_AM.png 

            It’s important to take time during the summer doing something you’re passionate about or to explore a new activity. It can be draining during the school year when you only focus on what you have to, rather than something that excites you. Spend your summer learning something new that you don’t have to opportunity to learn during the school year. The stress free, open schedule, and good weather of summer makes it the perfect time to do so!

 

If your children are not already signed up for a camp, you can look into specialty camps. These camps will focus on one specific activity so that campers can really perfect new skills. The Handwork Studio is a specialty camp with a focus in kids’ needle arts, machine sewing, and fashion. With multiple classes offered through out the summer and school year, The Handwork Studio works to instill a love of handwork arts in your children and teaches them skills that will last a lifetime.

Tags: Machine Sewing, Summer Camp, The Handwork Studio, Summer, Handwork, school

Why Working At Summer Camp is a Great Place to Learn Leadership Skills

Posted by Libby Foxman on Tue, Jul 05, 2016 @ 11:00 AM

It is important for young adults to develop leadership skills before they head off to work or college. These skills will teach them communication skills, to be hard working, dedicated, and able to be assertive in their workplace. One of the best ways to develop these skills is to look into counselor-in-training (CIT) programs at local summer camps. To be a part of the CIT program, you are usually a few years older than the oldest age group at the camp. You will assist the lead and junior counselors with the campers, usually picking up their lunches or taking them to the bathroom or to different activities through out the day. However, the responsibility and assertiveness you must have to be respected in this position will teach you great leadership skills that can be applicable in every stage of life.

 

You are responsible for children

            Although, as a CIT you are not solely in charge of a group of campers, there will be times where you have to take the campers from activity to activity without an older supervisor. Due to this, you need to have a sense of responsibility. You’ll have to know how many campers you have and where they are. Parents and lead counselors are leaving these campers in your care so you need to show that you are responsible enough for this position. Probably the biggest responsibility a CIT will have is their campers’ safety. Since they are in your care, you have to ensure that they are returned to their parents happy and healthy at the end of the day. Once in the workplace, leaders take responsibility for their actions and manage their own time and work.

 Screen_Shot_2016-06-30_at_9.08.57_AM.png

 

You have to set an example for your campers

At camp, you are one of the leaders of the group and due to this, you have to set an example for what is acceptable behavior. Young campers are extremely impressionable and will look to you for clues on how they are meant to act in certain situations. If you are setting a bad example through your language or behavior, they will mimic that. This teaches all CITs to be aware of their surroundings and who is listening. This awareness will be beneficial once you begin working in an office environment. Knowing how to behave in different environments will make you an attractive employee.

 Screen_Shot_2016-06-30_at_9.09.07_AM.png

 

You have to work with others

            In a camp setting, you are constantly surrounded by people, both counselors and campers, who need your attention. This will require you to not only create a balance between where you are needed but also to learn how to communicate effectively. While being in charge of young children, it will be crucial for you to communicate with lead counselors to let them know what you are doing. Lead counselors are in a position of authority, so you cannot speak to them as if they are one of your friends. Learning how to communicate with lead counselors will be good practice for when you have to communicate with your boss. Learning how to differentiate who you are talking whether it’s a supervisors and camper is a valuable skill to have.

            If you are interested in gaining these leadership skills, visit The Handwork Studio’s job listings page to see what is available or call 610-660-9600 for more information.

 

Tags: Summer Camp, Kids Camp, The Handwork Studio, Summer, kids, Handwork, jobs, careers

A Parent's Guide to Summer Camp

Posted by Libby Foxman on Tue, Jun 28, 2016 @ 12:00 PM

 

            Gone are the days when a camper’s only options for summer camp were day camp or sleep away camp. Luckily, besides those two awesome options, we now have even more! There are still the classic sleep away and day camps but also specialty camps, volunteer abroad programs, and virtual summer camps. To make your summer planning a little easier, here is you guide to summer camps.

Day Camp:

            Day camps usually touch on a wide variety of activities so that campers can move around through out the day. This includes different sports, swimming, theatre, arts and crafts and more. Day camps are great for younger children because they are given the opportunity to try many different activities to see what they have a genuine interest in. They are also a great introduction into camps for those who aren’t quite ready to leave home for the summer.

 Screen_Shot_2016-06-28_at_11.27.42_AM.png

 

Sleep Away Camp:

            Like day camp, sleep away camp also has campers moving from activity to activity through out they day. However, rather than ending their day in the late afternoon like day camp, these campers will stay over night for up to a few weeks. Due to this, sleep away camps will usually offer some nighttime activities such as dances, barbeques, and movie nights. This allows campers to develop deeper friendships that will last a lifetime; however, do be prepared for the homesick campers.

 

Specialty Camps:

            While day and sleep away camps allow campers to try out many different activities, specialty camps focus on one specific area so that campers can really enhance the skills needed for it. Specialty camps can be found for sports, theatre, the arts, and more. It’s a great way for campers to either develop skills in a new area or get more practice in something they already love.

 

Screen_Shot_2016-06-28_at_11.27.52_AM.png 

Virtual Camps:

            As technology continues to advance, it will continue to play a larger role in the lives of your children. You can order your groceries online to have them delivered, get a college degree online, or do all of your clothing shopping online. Now, campers are also able to participate in virtual summer camps. At these camps, campers can make projects, research new ideas, and go on “virtual adventures”. Many of these camps are specialty-oriented, free and provide the campers with individual attention; however, they do lose the nature aspect that other summer camps offer.

 

Adults Only Summer Camp:

            Why should the kids have all the fun this summer? The New York Times recently reported on adults-only summer camp to get you disconnected from your technology. Camp Bonfire is an adults-only summer camp but with the same activities and atmosphere as the sleep away camp you went to as a child. This is a great opportunity to get outside and de-stress from work and technology while your kids are also away at camp.

 

            Planning for summer can get lost on you when the end of the school year is so busy. Hopefully this outline of all types of camps available in the summer will make your planning a little less stressful and if doesn’t, check out that adults only summer camp!

 

The Handwork Studio is a specialty camp that focuses on kids' needle arts, machine sewing, and fashion. With locations up and down the east coast, The Handwork Studio employs professional artists, instructors, and teachers that will teach their campers skills such as hand and machine sewing, knitting, embroidery, and quilting. During the one-week sessions, campers will put theses skills to the test and bring home treasured handmade projects.

 

 

 

 

Tags: Machine Sewing, Fashion Camp, Summer Camp, Sewing, Summer, kids, Handwork

4 Projects to Get Ready For Summer

Posted by Libby Foxman on Tue, Jun 21, 2016 @ 11:00 AM


As the weather continues to heat up, we know that summer is here and with that comes a whole handful of preparations to make sure that your kids are ready for the beach, camp and whatever else you have planned. Here a 4 fun ways to get your kids ready the summer:

 

Tie-Dye Your Own Beach Towel:

            Rather than going out to buy brand new beach towels that you threw away last summer, find an old white one (or even some old bed sheets) in your linen closet and tie-dye it! You can roll up the towels however you want and tie it up into sections with rubber bands. Once that is done, get your tie-dye ready – it is probably easier to buy some at a store but there are ways to make your own using food coloring. Now that everything is prepped, put on your gloves and you can start tie dying by squeezing the dye into the each section of the towel! Make it as colorful and crazy as you want but be sure to let it dry for 6-8 hours before untying it and rinsing it off with a hose.

 

Screen_Shot_2016-06-21_at_9.03.30_AM.png  

 

Make a Pillowcase:

            When going away to sleep away camp, its always comforting to bring something personal from home. A great project to do with your camper before they leave for the summer is to make a pillowcase. All you need is two pieces of fabric, needle, thread, and whatever you want to use to decorate your pillowcase. The fabric can come from an old blanket or you can buy it at your local crafts store. To make the pillowcase, measure out the two pieces fabric to be the same size – or a little bit bigger- than your pillow. With your needle and thread, sew three sides of the pillowcase together, leaving one opening at the top for the pillow to fit into. Now that your pillowcase is made, you can decorate it by sewing on other patches of fabric or get iron-on patches. This is a great way to send your kid off to sleep away camp with a little bit of home.

 

Screen_Shot_2016-06-21_at_9.03.23_AM.png 

Decorate Your Backpack:

            At summer camp, whether it is sleep away or day camp, campers’ bags usually get thrown in with everyone else’s. So what better way to make your camper’s bag stand out than by decorating it with some patchwork? This is very easy to do and you hardly need to buy anything! You can use the same backpack from the school year and some old t-shirts or blankets. Along with these supplies, you’ll need a sewing needle and thread. Cut up your old t-shirts and blankets into shapes or letters and then sew them directly onto your backpack. This is a great project to get your kid ready and excited for camp this summer!

 

Make Your Own Sleeping Mask:

            A camper’s bunk at sleep away camp is usually nothing like their bedroom at home. They will probably be in a cabin with the rest of their age group who might be using night-lights and flashlights late into the night. A great project to do before they leave for camp is to make their own sleep mask. It will be a thoughtful reminder of home and help make the night a bit more peaceful. All you’ll need is two pieces of fabric, a piece of elastic, and two cut outs shaped like you mask and then you are ready to sew it all together either with a sewing machine or by hand. Click the image of the sleeping mask to be linked to The Handwork Studio’s How-To-Tuesday video to get a step-by-step tutorial on how to make your own!

Screen_Shot_2016-06-21_at_9.10.02_AM.png

 

If your child has an interest in sewing, design, or any other handwork crafts, go to The Handwork Studio website for our fall and summer camp schedule and live chat with Miss Catalina or call 610.660.9600 to see what would be best for your camper!

Tags: How to Tuesday, Summer Camp, Sewing, Knitting, The Handwork Studio, Summer, fun kids activities, activities, camp, Handwork, tie-dye

Meet The Campers

Posted by Catalina Lassen on Tue, Jun 14, 2016 @ 10:54 AM


       At The Handwork Studio, we pride ourselves on our campers’ enthusiasm, passion, and dedication to what they are learning in their classes. We hope to inspire hard work and creativity into their creations that will lead into a life-long passion. My name is Libby Foxman and I am the Marketing, Public Relations, and Social Media intern at The Handwork Studio this summer. I am excited to be a part of this team and share with you blogs and updates on social media. I first heard of The Handwork Studio from my sisters, Emily and Grace, who took camps here and had amazing experiences.

 

       Emily Foxman, who is now 22, participated in the Fashion Boot Camp at The Handwork Studio when she was 15. There, she was given the opportunity to design a collection and create 2 dresses. She says that the highlight of the class was visiting Mood Fabric Store in New York City. Emily says that Fashion Boot Camp helped develop her love of fashion and would recommend it because it was “an extremely effective way to learn so much about the fashion industry in one summer.” What Emily had learned in Fashion Boot Camp has made itself relevant in her everyday life. She now has a fashion-focused instagram and blog and enjoys designing her own pieces in her free time.

 

Screen_Shot_2016-06-10_at_4.48.50_PM.png

 

       My youngest sister, Grace, who is now 12 years old, took Fashion and Machine Sewing Camp at The Handwork Studio. She remembers it as a fun and unique experience. In the class, she was taught to use a sewing machine and the other skills needed in order to create her own projects. The students made laptop cases, bags, and sweat pants. Grace says she “felt fulfilled when [she] was able to make her own things.” Our teachers strive to create this sense of fulfillment in their students because we want them to see how hard work and dedication can pay off. Grace says she would recommend this class to others who want to learn life-long, useful techniques because “it was a fun and unique experience that introduced [her] to great friends.” 

 

Screen_Shot_2016-06-10_at_4.50.42_PM.png

 

       The Handwork Studio offers a number of summer camps including, Handwork Day Camp, Fashion and Machine Sewing, Fashion Boot Camp, Sew-Tech Camp, and Glamorize Your Doll. Be sure to check out The Handwork Studio website to see the full summer schedule and live chat with Miss Catalina to find the best class for your kids. 

 


 

Tags: Sewing, kids, camp, Handwork

Thanksgiving Craft Project For Kids!

Posted by Megan DiFeo on Wed, Nov 26, 2014 @ 11:03 AM

Handmade Turkey Craft Project For Kids
Here at The Handwork Studio we're all about crafting for every holiday. Since Thanksgiving is tomorrow we wanted to share this video of how to make a stuffed Thanksgiving Turkey. We're using polyfill to stuff this turkey not bread! This quick kid's craft project should take less than an hour to create. You'll need a few supplies to make this project happen:

  1. Felt

  2. Embroidery needle and thread

  3. Needle Felting Tools

  4. Polyfill (or leftover scraps to stuff your turkey)

  5. Animal eyes

    This video will take you through the steps of creating your stuffed Turkey.

 

From our Handwork Studio Family to yours - we wish you a very Happy Thanksgiving.

Tags: crafts, kids, Thanksgiving, Handwork