Purls of Wisdom

Narberth Holiday Family Events & Activities

Posted by Julia Yosen on Sat, Dec 01, 2018 @ 12:31 AM


Family Holiday Events in December Around Narberth

If you have yearning to go local this holiday season, we’ve compiled a helpful guide to all the great events/activities happening around Narberth and slightly beyond to make your holiday season extra special.

1. Clover Market

clover market philly

Dec. 1 & 2, 10am-5pm, located, at Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts (PAFA), Hamilton Building, 128 N. Broad Street, Philadelphia. A 2-day craft-aganza, featuring 75 vendors with high quality, beautifully presented products Both days will include, free craft-making activities, food, drinks and of course shopping! FREE EVENT

2. Dickens Festival

Dec. 2, 12-4pm, located in downtown Narberth between Haverford and Narberth Avenue. Spend a magical afternoon in Narberth filled with hot toddies (hot chocolate for the kids!), grumpy Scrooge sitings, holiday shopping, and even a scavenger hunt for the kids with prizes! FREE EVENT

3. Shop and Let the Kids Craft

Visit downtown Narberth and see a variety of local shops. Let the kids join a Handwork Studio crafting class. You can even try the first one for free! 

  • Winter Classes @ The Handwork StudioStarting Dec. 4 and goes to Feb. 24th. Join 10-weeks after-school and weekend classes.

  • Phavorite Philly Sports PJ's Workshop: Dec. 15th, 3:30-6:00pm: Choose from Eagles, Flyers, 76ers, or Phillies fabric to make into your own jammies. No experience necessary. Ages 8-15.  Cost: $40pp

  • Winter Break CampNeed nurturing care for your creative kids? Join for a half or full day of camp from Dec. 24th - Jan. 3rd at The Handwork Studio 

4. Hanukkah Menorah Lighting

menorah

Dec. 6, 5:45-6:30pm, located at the circle in front of Narberth Train Station, 211 Elmwood Avenue. Synagogues and Jewish organizations across the Main Line invite everyone to gather together to celebrate Hanukkah.  FREE EVENT

5. First Friday Narberth

Dec. 7 6:00-9:00pm, located at Sweet Mabel Store, 235 Haverford Ave, Narberth, PA 19072.  Opening Reception for the annual Art Under $100 Show. Meet the artists and enjoy refreshments and merriment. FREE EVENT

6. ALSF Charity Sewing Event @ The Handwork Studio

Dec. 7 6:30-8:30pm, at our Narberth Studio, 35 N. Narberth Avenue, Narberth, PA 19072. Help prep and sew quilts to be donated to families in need and auctioned off to raise money for  Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation (ALSF). No experience necessary. Space is limited must reserve your spot.

7. Nutcracker on Ice

Dec. 8th, 5pm, at Philadelphia Skating Club & Humane Society, 220 Holland Ave., Ardmore. Watch talented skaters perform selections from the Nutcracker. FREE EVENT

8. Santa at The Train Station

narb santa

Dec. 16th, at the Narberth Train Station circle, Santa arrives on the train to lead a sing-a-long to Christmas carols, music, and of course cookies and hot chocolate.  FREE EVENT


We hope you enjoy all the great events and activities with family and friends this season!

If you are still looking for more opportunities for your kids to engage in creative activities this holiday season, we have workshops, classes, and winter break camp all coming up this month too! 

Wishing you and yours a holiday season filled with happiness and a little craftiness!

 

 

 

Handmade is Heartfelt: 5 Tips to Guide DIY Gifts

Posted by Laura Kelly on Wed, Nov 21, 2018 @ 07:42 AM

Learn to Sew 5 Holiday Gift Giving Tips

A handmade gift is always a hit. Whether it's for the holiday season, a birthday gift, or even to just celebrate a Tuesday. However, we understand that sometimes going handmade can feel daunting which is why we put together this handy list of 5 practical tips to help you make thoughtful homemade gifts for your loved ones. 

1. Make Your DIY Gift Personal

How you ask?  Become a detective of course! We have found that the best way to pinpoint the perfect gift is to begin by creating lists about your recipient(s). Includes on your list their interests, big upcoming events, and even talk to other people that your recipient(s) are close to.  Sometimes outside perspective can offer a lot of insight. Ultimately, the goal is to find ways to better understand your gift recipient and in return give them a something they will truly appreciate.

2. Bigger is NOT Always Better 

Sometimes grandiose plans can lead to disappointment and frustration. No one needs to ruin  their gift-giving experience with a "Pinterest Fail".  When making gifts, especially if you want to do it for multiple people, think about your timeline (how long do you really have), what materials are accessible to you, how much are you willing to spend, and what skills you are already comfortable with?  Sewing ten king size quilts for your family members might not be a realistic option if you have never sewn before and it is already Dec. 23rd. However, cute patchwork pillows might be perfect for your skillset and super useful, fun, and decorative for the receiver.

3. Learn a New Crafting Skill, It's Healthy!

Even though we just mentioned to think about what skills you are comfortable with, there is nothing wrong with learning something new and using it to help create gifts. While, it might take some time to learn a new technique, often simple versions of many crafting skills can be learned quickly and still allow for you to create a wow gift!  Hats, scarves, pillows are all easy handmade gift ideas that can be really impressive.  Also, as an added benefit to making gifts and learning new craft skills, there are studies that proclaim long term benefits that crafting can be a stress reducer, it can help keep your mind and hands sharp, boost your confidence and much more. See an article on "The Unexpected Benefits of Crafting"

4. Give the Gift that Keeps on Giving and Give the Gift of Creativity! (Say that 5 times fast!)

Sometimes in all the hustle and bustle of life, making a handmade gift is just not in the super fancy scrapbooked cards, so flip the switch and give the gift of creativity!  An experience gift is an awesome way to create lasting memories and make something too!  Think about signing your loved one for a creative class that might match their interests such as cooking, painting and even knitting. Added bonus, sign up for a class together so this can be a special experience for the both of you! 

5. Where To Start?!?! 

Holy Moly, where to even begin on this one. The internet can be a great place to start but we all know that the interwebs can suck us into the black hole of no return and often can lead to being overwhelmed and paralyzed on where to begin.  To help get your footing (or hands!) into the world of Handcrafts, we have a list of Handwork Studio resources to kick your gift-making into gear!  

Handwork Studio Craft Kits and Tools

Handwork Studio Video Tutorials

Simplicity Sewing patterns by The Handwork Studio

Classes and Workshops (Narberth, PA only)

Handwork Studio Pinterest Page  

Another great option to help get you started is is to sign up for Social Media groups that focus around crafting and you will have a whole hive of creative folks to inspire you, offer advice and even  bounce ideas and opinions off of. 

Holiday Gifts for girls Crafting Scarf kit

Devon with her Handmade Hat and Scarf

With all this being said, we know life can get busy and it can be hard to find the time but we want to cheer you on and know we are here to support you in this well worth it endeavor. If you ever have any question for ideas or where to start feel free to reach out to us at support@thehandworkstudio.com.  Here's to a wonderful season of crafty creating!!

Alumni Profile Series: Lizzy Gee

Posted by Cameron Lee on Sun, Nov 04, 2018 @ 10:00 AM

We hope you enjoy the fourth installment in the Alumni Profile Series, which features profiles of the Handwork Studio graduates (and some current members) and gives you an inside look into their lives!

For a shorter biography of Lizzy Gee, check out the alumni page of our website! 

Lizzy Gee Headshot

Name: Elizabeth Marie Gee
Age: 22
Education: 2018 graduate of the Pratt Institute
Majors: Fashion Design BFA
Website: www.lizzygee.com
Instagram: @treslizzy

 

Who is Lizzy Gee?

SHe's a Rebel 1-198551-editedFrom perusing Lizzy Gee’s website before our interview, it is easy to tell that she is a colorful person, an imbues that sense of boldness and brightness in her designs. Seeing Lizzy’s outfit and a small section of her apartment on our video call only confirms that she loves color, and I can’t want to hear what she has to say. Lizzy graduated from the Pratt Institute in New York just a few months before our interview with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Fashion Design and is currently working as a head teacher at The Handwork Studio as she makes plans for her future.

I ask Lizzy a few fun questions to get us into the interview, and in the process learn that the night before our conversation she watched the movie Stardust on Netflix. (Lizzy is a huge sci-fi and fantasy fan.) If Lizzy could be any animal, she would be a flamingo because she loves pink, and her website is full of vibrant shades of the color. Lastly, I ask Lizzy what she wants to be when she grows up, and she laughs. “Well, I’m being it! A fashion designer!”

 

Early Involvement in Handwork and The Handwork Studio

Lizzy started knitting classes at the Handwork Studio when she was eight, and after a year of that she started machine sewing. Lizzy also did Fashion Bootcamp at the Handwork Studio for four or so years, and credits her experiences there with helping her develop her entire fashion skill set before she went to college. “Without them, I wouldn’t have known any of it, because no one in my family can even hand sew. So I’m officially the seamstress of the house, thanks to them.” Lizzy was interested in handwork before she began attending the Handwork Studio classes, however, because she was always intrigued by the idea that she could draw something and have an idea and then actually bring that idea to life. She dabbled in making board games when she was younger, but nothing clicked with her more than knitting and making clothes.

While she was 13 (and still attending Fashion Bootcamp at the Handwork Studio), Lizzy also started working as an assistant instructor, helping out at birthday parties and camp during the summer at the Narberth studio, an experience that foreshadowed her current position as head teacher. Lizzy tells me about a time during Fashion Bootcamp that stands out to her as a perfect representation of how great the Handwork Studio was in helping build her as a person and a designer. “I remember Ms. Alisha and Ms. Julia tried to help me figure out how to thread a serger. That’s a much more complex machine than a sewing machine, and it uses five threads, and they sat with me for like two hours trying to figure it out. That was the next step, and they were happy to help me through it.”

 

Lizzy’s Journey

Wilder WoMann 2-379538-editedBecause Lizzy has known that she wanted to go into fashion for so long, she was able to start having incredible job and internship experience at a relatively young age. When she was still in high school, Lizzy took classes at the Moore College of Art and Design and interned at the costume department at Villanova University (where they thought she was a college student until the very end of the internship, when they found out she was only 16!).

Once she arrived in New York for her freshman year at Pratt, Lizzy started interning right away, even though her university advised incoming students against doing so because companies might try to take advantage of them. Lizzy heeded the warning but once met a woman near her school named Julie Mollo who had her own studio and made performance-wear for different musicians, Lizzy jumped at the opportunity to learn from the business and see what it takes to run your own brand. Lizzy planned to intern for bigger and bigger brands over the years to gain a variety of working experience in different environments, so her second internship was with a designer named Mara Hoffman. Hoffman taught Lizzy all about print design, something she had been interested in ever since she attended the Handwork Studio. Lizzy’s third internship was with her “idol, Christian Siriano. When I got an internship with him, I was like ‘I think this is the pinnacle. I don’t know how I can get any better than this.’ I just love that he does plus size too, and I’ve only ever made designs for myself, and I’ve been plus size since middle school. So it was really nice to meet someone who doesn’t care what size you are, and is going to make something nice no matter what.”

I, like Lizzy, attend university in New York, so I ask her what it was like to move from outside of Pennsylvania to the city. “I love it. It’s definitely a different pace than any other city. But I love it. I think it helps that I went to a school that still has a campus feeling, so you feel that calm amongst the crazy. If I had gone to Parsons or FIT [Fashion Institute of Technology] I would have felt very overwhelmed and I wouldn’t have stayed after graduating. But I plan to stay for at least a year.” I agree. I love the city, but without a quiet, collegiate campus, my university experience would be very different than it is now.Wilder WoMann 4

Like many people, my sense of the fashion industry, especially in New York, is that it can be pretty cutthroat. Movies like The Devil Wears Prada depict a very specific image of what that world resembles, and I ask Lizzy if it was at all daunting to enter that universe as a young designer. “There’s definitely stereotypes for a reason,” she tells me, “And I’ve met all of them. Surprisingly enough there’s all different kinds of personalities and brands out there, but you can find a really different experience than the harsh, cutthroat environment they make it out to be. My very first big brand internship was Mara Hoffman and...it was one of the most welcoming environments. So it depends on the environment, and there’s definitely brands out there that can take advantage and make you feel like you can’t do it, but there’s also brands that want you to succeed. Even though The Devil Wears Prada tries to tell you different.”

Apparently, other people in Lizzy’s life were concerned about how she would fare in the New York fashion industry as well because she would get a lot of "'Oh, you’re too nice to be in fashion. Oh, you’re too sweet, you’re not gonna make it. But you can always be like a teacher?’” Lizzy ignored all those comments. “My main thing is to run my own brand, and the only way to do that is if I work for a brand...Why not try to go in there and make a change? I love it so much; I’m not gonna give up just because some people tell me they think my designs are ugly or something.”

 

Lizzy’s Art

As I guessed from looking at her website and seeing her for the first time, Lizzy loves color. She elaborates on her art and vision, and why she creates the way that she does.

SHe's a Rebel 2“I always have had a lot of color and boldness with my designs. I try to balance femininity and edge, so I design for a girl who wants to wear pink and wear bright colors, but also, you know, don’t mess with her. That’s the vibe I’m trying to bring out. Also when I went to Pratt, I started to learn about menswear, and I love the idea of helping straight men not have a fear of dressing flamboyant and wearing what they want. I have a lot of friends who are guys, and they love my designs, but they’re too afraid. If they want to wear a really bold print, they’re worried people will assume certain things about them rather than think they just really enjoy color."

"I want to create a brand that blends that aesthetic together and is not really defined by gender or a demographic; it’s just a personality. And that is a more feminine edge, I guess. It would be made sustainably. What I tried to learn in school is the best way to sustainably create prints and textiles, because that’s where most of the pollution comes from in fashion. All that dying, all that manipulating of materials to create the fabrics we have. Which ones are the best in terms of decomposing, which ones last the most so we won’t be throwing away garments? I’m trying to find a universal quality to having fun with prints and color.”

Lizzy’s artistic vision changed significantly while she attended Pratt, and she expects more change to come. She made five mini-collections before she even started college, so she thought she knew what she wanted, but learning about menswear, prints, and accessories at Pratt helped expand Lizzy’s horizons. She’s now more open to starting her brand with accessories and building into clothes or experimenting with a more versatile range of techniques and demographics.

 

Trials and Successes

One instance immediately comes to mind when I ask Lizzy if there’s anything she’s done over the last few years that she’s especially proud of.

Dancing Lobsters

“I’ve always dabbled in costume design, but that’s never been where I definitely wanted to go because I want to design for the everyday person as well. I’ve never wanted to design clothes that feel exclusive, you know? That’s why I get rigid if I know I have to sell something for slightly more expensive than I’d buy it at. But there was a costume design competition at Pratt. They partnered with a famous boutique in Manhattan to do this competition, and the winner’s costume would be displayed in the front window. Which is a dream come true for anyone who wants to show their own designs. I initially didn’t think I was going to do it because I was stressed out with what I was doing, and the theme was under the sea, and I was like, okay, a million people are gonna do mermaids and jellyfish. I like to put a humorous spin on my work, and I couldn’t think of anything for the first week. My professors kept telling me to apply and try, and midnight the night before it was due I remembered The Amanda Show, and my favorite part of that show was with Judge Trudy, who always yelled “Bring in the Dancing Lobsters!” and I was like ‘Oh, my God. I’m gonna make a dancing lobster. But I’m gonna make it sexy and elegant, but it's still gonna be the dancing lobster. A costume that you can dance in.’ So that’s what I made.”

Lizzy describes the lobster dress as “kind of cartoonish but elegant,” with sequins, long antennae, and a tail like a train. “And I ended up winning,” she tells me, with a smile. It was the first time Lizzy had a window front with her name on it, and she was thrilled when she was it in person for the first time. After the competition, Lizzy ended up getting a contract with the store and sold a few more dresses to them.

When I ask Lizzy if she would change anything about the last few years, she has a surprising and refreshing answer. “I don’t know if I would change anything.” She pauses for a long time to think, and I make sure to tell her that she doesn’t have to have something and that it’s a good thing if she doesn’t want to change anything about her recent life. Ultimately, however, Lizzy tells me that if she “had to choose something...I did a summer abroad in London, and I loved it so much; I applied for the college experience and decided not to go. I wasn’t sure if I should do that, because I was so young. But after going, I totally could have done it. But I love New York. So if anything, maybe I would have done that as my fashion degree. So if I decide to get my masters I’d go there.”Wilder WoMann 1

Lizzy’s final words prove to be fantastic advice for anyone reading this, but especially for kids at the Handwork Studio who wish to pursue careers in fashion. “Don’t listen to anybody who says what you’re doing is weird or out of the ordinary or that it can’t happen,” she says, “Because you can make it happen. That’s literally what being a designer is. You design clothes you’ve never seen before. What makes you different is what makes you succeed. That’s not pushed in the classroom enough. There’s multiple ways to get to where you wanna be...Having patience with yourself and learning the skills to create is the hardest at the beginning. I’m teaching a group of machine sewers right now, and they already think they’re bad at it, almost. Every time they make a little mistake. That’s probably the hardest thing. Once you learn all those mistakes are learning experiences you can build upon, fashion will come so naturally to you, and you can go and have a career in it.”


Photo 1: Portrait of Lizzy Gee
Photo 2: Lizzy wearing clothes from her "S/he's a Rebel" Collection, 2016
Photo 3: Model wearing clothes from Lizzy's "Wilder Wo/mann" Collection, 2017
Photo 4: Model wearing clothes from Lizzy's "Wilder Wo/mann" Collection, 2017
Photo 5: Model wearing clothes from Lizzy's "S/he's a Rebel" Collection, 2016
Photo 6: Lizzy's "Dancing Lobsters" costume in the window of Screaming Mimis
Photo 7: Lizzy and models wearing clothes from her "Wilder Wo/mann" Collection, 2017

The Handwork Stories: Tim Pence

Posted by Mattie Solomon on Sun, Oct 28, 2018 @ 10:00 AM

In this series we have been sharing stories about the people and places where The Handwork Studio team members find inspiration for their craft. In order to expand our community we will explore the different ways that people got their start in sewing, knitting, and other needlework crafts. This series explores the art that goes behind this craft and understanding the sources of inspiration for different people, and this week will be introducing you to Tim Pence! 

The Creative Type

Headshot1There can be this assumption within handwork that one is taught these skills at a young age and has then stuck with that craft ever since. For some, however, needle arts can come later as a result of their passion for creativity and art. For regional camp manager Tim Pence, his connection to needle arts did not come until more recently. Before he found his passion for sewing in undergraduate school, he seemed to dip his toe into many different creative fields within the world of visual arts.

Tim’s creativity was discovered at a pretty young age as he and his brother became big fans of the He-Man cartoon and the Oz book series. “We took this to another level by creating elaborate storylines for our toys and improvising the outcomes,” and Tim said that ultimately, he loved being able to create a different world to play in.

Headshot2In his earliest memories, Tim fell in love with drawing and the kind of limitless places that it could take his imagination. He specifically really found a passion for drawing comics. When he was in third grade, Tim says that two of his friend in elementary and middle school would spend a lot of time creating comics. He and his friends “took this pretty seriously,” and in that time wrote and drew many different stories that seemed to spark a slightly embarrassed laugh from Tim even today.

Although Tim mentioned that these were maybe not the most groundbreaking pieces of work, he stated that it was a great way to get his ideas out when he was younger. This love of drawing and creating comics was just the beginning of Tim coming to understand not only what art means in a general sense, but what art means to him.

Cowboys and IndiansAs mentioned, Tim says that when he was doing needle work in college that was the time he felt really connected to needle arts. Now, as a MFA candidate in Theatre Set Design at Temple University, Tim feels as though he is finally being able to draw all of his influences into his work in lots of new and interesting ways. His program has been a great way to apply what he has learned to incorporate all of the senses into his work, and he feels as though he is able to reach a larger audience. “I think I have done a lot of exploring with different materials, processes, and mediums. Theatre design sort of gives me a context and a way to process all of it. I have been building up a vocabulary and now I have been finding a place to use that vocabulary,” said Tim.

sewn print on spongeWhen asking what has inspired his work, he said that one thing that he really looked to for inspiration was the music of Kate Bush, which he discovered in his early twenties. Even though he has never worked with music himself, he thought that her use of metaphor and the way she talked about her music was something that helped him “discover what art was.” It is interesting to see how music could inspire his work with visual art. Tim said, “I’m most transported by music as an art form, though I’m not a musician. It’s my goal to transport others in the same way, but through an immersive visual experience.” Along with her music, Tim said he is also inspired by relationships, nature, and the different materials he encounters.

Making art has become a huge part of Tim’s life, and something that has ultimately brought him to The Handwork Studio. While working towards his degree, he has loved being able to teach kids to hone in on their own creativity and introduce them to handwork. Allowing kids to access their own creativity is something that Tim sees as being very important. “It’s not something they would be learning in school to this degree. So, to be teaching them so many different things and watching them do things for themselves is really rewarding.” While teaching kids today how to grow in their creativity, he is also always looking for ways to improve and grow within his own craft.

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Click here for a look at our summer sewing camp options for your child. Also, be sure to check out our store and our new partnership with Simplicity Sewing Patterns

The Handwork Stories: Ana Castro

Posted by Mattie Solomon on Sun, Oct 14, 2018 @ 10:00 AM

In this series we have been sharing stories about the people and places where The Handwork Studio team members find inspiration for their craft. In order to expand our community we will explore the different ways that people got their start in sewing, knitting, and other needlework crafts. This series explores the art that goes behind this craft and understanding the sources of inspiration for different people, and this week will be introducing you to Ana Castro!

Artful Thinking

AnaAndLinusWhen asking studio administrator Ana Castro about the moment she caught the crafting bug, she paused for a moment, and attempted to trace herself back to that singular moment. After lingering over the thought, she responded, “Well, I never wanted to be anything other than an artist,” which truly speaks to the meaningful way in which Ana has viewed the journey of her craft throughout her entire life. Some people can pinpoint an exact moment when they were taught a certain craft, or maybe trace it back to a certain person, but for Ana, it seems that creativity has been at the forefront of her life from the very beginning.

Ana has always been surrounded by creativity, and a lot of her inspiration today comes from her Costa Rican background. The colors and textiles that come from that area really inspire a lot of her work, and she loves to infuse the styles of their traditional interior design into the pieces she creates. Along with her Costa Rican background, Ana also finds a lot of inspiration, especially when it comes to her color palate, from the style of the 90’s and the different toys she had when she was growing up. So, while one side of her pulls her towards the image of the traditional Central America home, another brings her towards her childhood in the states.

Growing up, Ana said she spent a lot of time by herself, therefore finding imaginative ways to express herself. “I’m an introvert, and you know a lot of people wouldn’t realize that when they meet me,” said Ana. A lot of her work is then inspired by the kinds of activities she did when she was younger, while discovering who she was. Most of her work is inspired by the body, and by movement and dance specifically. She says that a lot of her pieces mimic this sort of fluffy and plump feeling. Although never fully realizing it, Ana sees now how her childhood has found its way naturally into her work today.

AnaDressingLoomAnother part of who inspired Ana’s creativity growing up were her parents. Both of her parents are chefs, and she said that seeing them be creative helped foster creativity within herself. “They were so resourceful, and everything had to be made a certain way,” mentioned Ana, and it was the ways in which they always thought outside of the box which allowed her to think that her career as an artist could be what it is today.

Ana got her degree in crafts from University of the Arts in Philadelphia in 2014, where she fell in love with the entire creation process. During a critique for one of her earlier pieces, she realized that the work she creates has more meaning than just its materials. “I found that everything has a connotation whether you want it to or not. That was an inspiring moment and I chose to pursue that kind of craft after that point.” Then after University, Ana was drawn to the vision of The Handwork Studio, saying “I thought it was really lovely that they were expanding the audience [for needle arts] and that they were fostering a community.”

AnaArtworkNow, Ana embraces the meditative practice of her craft and loves being able to pass on these fiber arts techniques to kids today. “The projects they make become a part of their life in a much different way than store bought toys. We give kids the autonomy to pick every single part of their piece out, and that way they will value it so much more highly,” she said. By giving kids the opportunity to make these crafts a part of their life, Ana believes that more and more kids will be able to find ways of expressing themselves in the creative ways she did growing up.

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Click here for a look at our summer sewing camp options for your child. Also, be sure to check out our store and our new partnership with Simplicity Sewing Patterns

The Handwork Stories: Alisa Cavanaugh

Posted by Mattie Solomon on Sun, Sep 30, 2018 @ 10:00 AM

In this series we have been sharing stories about the people and places where The Handwork Studio team members find inspiration for their craft. In order to expand our community we will explore the different ways that people got their start in sewing, knitting, and other needlework crafts. This series explores the art that goes behind this craft and understanding the sources of inspiration for different people, and this week will be introducing you to Julia Yosen!

A Family Affair

Screen Shot 2018-08-07 at 3.08.00 PMFor Alisa Cavanaugh, her connection to needle arts has been somewhat of a family affair. After learning crafting skills from her grandmother when she was younger, Alisa continued that legacy and passed those skills onto her own children. Teaching her kids how to tap into their creativity is something that Alisa values a lot and finds super important in any kid’s life.

“Kids don’t always have the opportunity to express themselves, but at The Handwork Studio, a child can learn something no matter their age, and walk away with something that they created ton their own. I think every kid needs some sort of outlet to be creative,” said Alisa, and it has definitely been a creative outlet that has struck a chord with her eleven-year-old daughter and nine-year-old son. Both of Alisa’s children have really connected with The Handwork Studio, but their journey and passion with needle arts is very different from one another.

Alisa’s son has more of an eye for detail and does not mind the kind of patience it takes to complete some projects. He has really loved to do embroidery because of the time and skill it takes to complete this. Alisa has also recently taught him how to corner to corner knit, and he will often stitch alongside her. This image really reflects the moments Alisa shared with her grandmother, who taught her how to cross stitch. “I ended up spending some time with my grandparent when I was young, and I remember sitting with her on her sun porch and just stitching with her. Her walking me through it and explaining the counting. I liked that it was kind of like a puzzle.” Even though her son may not be able to complete as many stitches as her, he loves figuring it all out with her.

Her daughter on the other hand, will have a project in mind and want to complete it right on the spot. Alisa said she really likes machine sewing, but sometimes has trouble with the amount of time that goes along with it. A few weeks ago, at sew tech, she was super excited to make an otter from all of the kinetic threads involved. Even though the project took some time, Alisa said that seeing each step be completed and having an end goal within each day helped her feel motivated and excited about coming back to the same project day after day. Alisa’s daughter ended up being super proud of that and loved all of the conductive pieces that allowed her to really see her progress. Alisa says both of her kids, however, love to do these things because it allows them to be creative.

Before becoming a Program Manager at the Narberth Studio, Alisa worked just down the street from the Studio. When she discovered the program, she thought about how great of an idea it was. She loved the idea that kids who were not learning these types of skills could have the opportunity to see what they could accomplish and what they could gain from learning needle arts.

When asking about her own connection to The Handwork Studio, and the impact she thinks it has on kids today, Alisa said, “It’s a great place because I enjoy what they do. It’s a great opportunity for kids to learn something a little different, and you know? It’s something my kids enjoy too!” So after sending her own kids to the camp during a winter workshop, Alisa let her career lead her back to the program her children loved so much.

“It's always been about a gift of love for me,” said Alisa. Creativity and this love of creating things through handwork is something that lies very close to home for her. After learning how to cross stitch and do other arts and crafts from her grandmother and aunt, Alisa loves being able to find a way to pass these kinds of skills onto her own children and all of the children who discover The Handwork Studio.

__________________________________________________________________________Click here for a look at our summer sewing camp options for your child. Also, be sure to check out our store and our new partnership with Simplicity Sewing Patterns! 

 

Alumni Profile Series: Julia Haines

Posted by Cameron Lee on Sun, Sep 23, 2018 @ 10:00 AM

The Alumni Profile Series will feature profiles of graduates (and some current members) of the Handwork Studio and give you an inside look into how they maintain their passion for the craft! We hope that learning about the alumni will inspire your kids to follow in their footsteps and help them see that no matter who they are, what their background in handwork is, and what they hope to be when they grow up, they can do anything they put their minds to!

For a shorter biography of Julia Haines, check out the alumni page of our website! 

Julia Haines Headshot

Name: Julia Claire Haines
Age: 22
Education: 5th year student in the Tyler School of Art at Temple University in Philadelphia, PA
Majors: Fibers and Material Studies, with a certificate in Art Education
Website: www.juliaclairehaines.com/

 

Who is Julia Haines?

I sit down to talk to Julia Claire Haines on a sunny Thursday afternoon in the summer. There is a brief bit of fumbling as we both try to get our video and audio to work, but after a very friendly introduction, we get down to the interview.

Julia Haines Portrait

After asking some standard questions about her education and age, I tell Julia that I want to ask her some fun questions, so our readers can get to know her a bit more. I end up learning that the last thing Julia watched on TV was an episode of the second season of Netflix’s Queer Eye with her mom and that if she were an animal, she would be a hedgehog because she is “small and dutiful and sometimes prickly, but mostly soft.” When I ask Julia what her favorite type of art is, she immediately tells me that fiber art is her passion. She uses fabric and other craft-based mediums to create 2D and 3D works, and she particularly loves silkscreen printing on fabric and embroidery. To Julia, handwork is a very directional and soothing process.

When I ask her what she wants to be when she grows up, Julia responds enthusiastically with “A lot of things! But I graduate next year, and when I graduate, I want to teach art, either in Philly or one of the surrounding districts.” She wants to teach at a public school, preferably K-12, and credits working with elementary aged students at the Handwork Studio for helping her become more open to teaching younger children. 

 

Early Involvement in Handwork and The Handwork Studio

Julia’s formal introduction to handwork is synonymous with her introduction to the Handwork Studio because she became involved with both in elementary school when her mom won a week’s worth of classes for her in a raffle at the Alex’s Lemonade Stand annual fundraiser. Before attending the Handwork Studio’s classes, Julia tried - unfortunately unsuccessfully - to teach herself to knit and was interested in sewing and embroidery, so she loved learning these skills in a more structured setting at the Handwork Studio. After being a part of the Handwork Studio family for several years, Julia took a brief break, then came back as a CIT for some time during high school. Then, she tells me, “I went to Tyler and I kind of returned to my roots, I think because, for me, my foundation in art is definitely through sewing and handcraft and not necessarily in drawing and painting. So once I became more confident in my abilities as an artist at Temple, I started really diving into fiber practices again.” Julia currently works as a counselor at the Narberth studio and ended up applying for the position after bumping into owner and founder Laura Kelly this spring.

I ask Julia to reflect on the experiences she had at the Handwork Studio as a child and how they impacted her, and she makes it clear that they “were definitely formative. I learned how to do these skills that pretty much transferred to my university education, which is kind of cool, I think. To learn something when you’re like ten years old, eleven years old, and that actually comes into your college experience.”

Another part of Julia's experience at the Handwork Studio that impacted her was the atmosphere. “I remember feeling so comfortable and safe when I was there and that contentment that I felt while I was there was a good gauge in every other situation I found myself in growing up. Whether that was like formal activities or with friends. I kind of knew what this really nice, gentle comfort was.”

 

Julia’s Journey

There are plenty of kids at the Handwork Studio who want to pursue pathes like Julia’s and go to art school or continue to involve handwork in their careers in some way, so I ask her about her work experience and what led her to decide to attend the Tyler School of Art. It turns out Julia has been involved in a lot over the past few years and loves to keep herself busy, and the diversity of her work experience only reflects the sentiment that she wants to be a lot of things when she “grows up.”

The summer after her freshman year at Tyler Julia worked as an education intern at The Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia, where she researched their Navajo textile collection and compiled an information booklet for docents who lead student tours. She also worked for the same foundation the summer after her sophomore year of art school, but this time she went into their classrooms and evaluated how well the artists were teaching kids about the Barnes artwork and helped expand the children's’ critical thinking and analysis skills. This same summer Julia worked for Anthropologie as a display intern. In between all this Julia has worked on the sets of several movies doing costumes, photography, and production work, and in addition to working at the Handwork Studio this past summer, she was the blogger and insight editor for one of her professors, who sells tufting guns. Handwork, she says, has basically played a roll in all the jobs she has had so far.

As someone who briefly considered going to art school myself, I am genuinely interested in Julia’s choice to go to the Tyler School of Art, which she describes as a very last minute decision. She tells me that she took advanced art in high school but never considered art school because she thought it meant mostly drawing and painting realism and she wasn’t as good at that as she wanted to be. When she was a senior Julia was accepted to Temple University as a biology major, but January of that year she decided impulsively to apply to Tyler and scrambled her portfolio together in a month. “It was the smartest and the dumbest thing I’ve ever done,” she laughs when I tell her how impressive that is.

HWHaines12-1Once she got to Tyler, Julia never took any class or experience for granted because she just got in “by the skin of my teeth - the day before the deadline-” so she was open to any and all critique about her work. When I ask her what her typical day looks like, Julia tells me that her class schedule is pretty low maintenance - three studio classes a semester, each two and a half hours long and twice a week, and then two or three other classes that occur one to three times a week. This past year Julia went to the studio every day after classes, especially when she was busy preparing for her thesis show between November and January, and she easily spent 40 hours there each week. She admits that spending so much time in the studio can sometimes be rough, but that having friends both in the studio to keep her company and friends outside of the art school to keep her grounded and supports her makes it better. “If you love it, it’s fine,” she tells me. “It’s the only time that your only obligation is just to make art and if you don’t take advantage of it, you’re not being smart. At the end of the day, it’s fun.”

 

Julia’s Art

IMG_0719+copy+2I ask Julia to describe her art, and from where she draws inspiration. Does she have a theme that most of her art revolves around? Has that developed with college? “I’ve reached the most mature phase of my art where there’s this theme I’m really engaged with,” she tells me, “And mediums I’m very committed to so I’m able to compound my work one on top of another.” She warns me that she’s essentially reciting her artist’s statement and can send it to me if I’d like (she does!), but explains the concepts behind her art anyway.

“I’m inspired by the impact that genetics play in our lives, both biologically, geographically, and politically. I draw a lot of inspiration from my mom’s side of the family who immigrated to the US at the turn of the century to a coal town and exploring how each generation changes but how these initial industrial towns that were hubs of immigration have gone into a decline and that is often politicized by all sides of the political spectrum. I’m sort of evaluating the romanticization of these industrial towns and how they impact the future generations. And the mediums that I work in to explore this theme are screen prints that I print on fabric, and these prints are derived from photographs that I’ve taken specifically of the town that my great-grandparents and my grandparents grew up in, specifically their blocks and their houses. And I’m especially fascinated with these very small but beautiful details in architecture such as shingles or molding that I then try to extrapolate on a much larger scale either through installation or soft sculpture. And I play with either very muted or very vivid colors depending on what emotion I’m trying to evoke with the piece.”HWHaines11-1

I’m impressed that she can speak so openly and eloquently about her art considering it’s difficult to analyze your own work, and she tells me that it definitely took her a long time to focus on that theme. When you first go to art school, she says, people are “making art about just anything” and she got caught up in that wave, because “it’s hard to be introspective and not oversimplify yourself.” Over the years she’s focused more on making art for herself and not for others, and, in her words, “a lot has changed politically since I entered freshman year in 2014,” she is now more interested in “why politicians target these towns and what they had to gain from them.”


Trials and Successes

HWHaines001I warn Julia that we’re getting to the end of my long list of questions, but that I still have a few important ones left. I ask her what she’s done that she’s the proudest of in the last few years, and she says her thesis show without hesitation. Many complications went into the show, and she spent a wild two months putting it together, but in the end, it was worth all the stress. She tells me that she took a lot of things that were painful to her and translated them to a large-scale installation - larger scale than she had ever done before - and it turned out great. After her thesis show, Julia had to prepare for another show in April, and she said that through all this stress she learned how to trust her decisions more.

When I ask Julia what she wishes she could change about the last few years, she answers me easily, and confidently. “I could be hard on myself and I could say ‘I wish you were more honest with your art practice and you weren’t trying to make art for other people and you were just focusing on yourself first and other people second.’ Because I feel like at the beginning I was very focused on what my critique would be like and what people would think of it, not necessarily what I even thought of it. I was just picking stuff that I thought looked good or was pretty. So if I could, I would go back and change that, but I feel like that’s just something that happens with time and there's no point in being sad about that. I would have been more selective about some of the people I chose to spend my time with. I think your gut instincts are usually correct about people, and I should have relied on those instincts more. Academics wise I wouldn’t really change anything. I think things happened the way they were supposed to.”HWHaines004

I think that’s a great philosophy, and I tell her so, and she, humbly, shakes her head and thanks me.

Finally, we reach the last of my many questions. Does Julia have anything else to say about the Handwork Studio? She thinks for a good moment before telling me that being back at the Handwork Studio and in that community of educators has been wonderful and that it is great to see people’s passion and how much they support each other.

“[The Handwork Studio] definitely changed a lot of things about my life, and I know it will change things about other people’s lives too.”


Photo 1: Portrait of Julia Haines
Photo 2: Julia with her project, "In This Last of Meeting Places," 2018
Photo 3: Piece from "In This Last of Meeting Places," 2018
Photo 4: Piece from "In This Last of Meeting Places," 2018
Photo 5: Piece from "In This Last of Meeting Places," 2018
Photo 6: Piece from "Point of Replication," 201
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Photo 7: Piece from "Point of Replication," 2018

The Handwork Stories: Julia Yosen

Posted by Mattie Solomon on Sun, Sep 16, 2018 @ 10:00 AM

In this series we have been sharing stories about the people and places where The Handwork Studio team members find inspiration for their craft. In order to expand our community we will explore the different ways that people got their start in sewing, knitting, and other needlework crafts. This series explores the art that goes behind this craft and understanding the sources of inspiration for different people, and this week will be introducing you to Julia Yosen! 

“For the Love of Teaching”

After graduating college with a fine arts degree, Julia Yosen found herself at a quarter life crisis asking herself, “What am I supposed to do with this?” This all too familiar end of college standstill is something that a lot of art students face, and leaves many with the question: well, what about teaching?

164085_512037776023_2250635_n (1)For Julia, teaching seemed to be the best option, but in that choice lies a path that she believed to be quite limiting. Julia moved from Vermont back to her hometown in Pennsylvania in 2006, and it was while she was working at a Joann Fabric, that The Handwork Studio fell into her view.

An almost serendipitous job opportunity was presented to her, and in that job, she could connect some of the many things that she feels connected to and is so passionate about. Melissa, a teacher at the Handwork Studio, connected with Julia while she was working at the cutting counter at the Joann Fabric. Melissa opened up an opportunity to get in on the ground floor of something that would “revolutionize needle arts.” With a dream to connect a new generation of kids to needle arts, Julia jumped at the prospect of being an instructor for one of the first workshops and programs The Handwork Studio ever held. That was when her start with The Handwork Studio began, but her connection to needle arts and crafting goes back a little earlier.

Julia first fell in love with crafting as she walked through the aisles of an A.C Moore. The arts & craft store’s endless creative possibilities excited the crafting gene in Julia. Two of her best friends and her would go down into her basement and move from one project to the next, which mimics the kind of collaboration and creative exploration that she would be facilitating at The Handwork Studio camps some years later.

Whether it was making clothes for their American Girl dolls by cutting up a box of their old clothes or making pig puppets they found in the back of the book, The Wonderful Pigs of Jillian Jigs, they were never short of crafts to tackle. “It was always the three of us in our basement, making all of these terrible projects. We would stay down there for hours,” said Julia, and it was here that she caught the bug for crafting.

As a kid who would always be starting her next project, Julia believes that there is something so empowering about creating something on your own. When you use your own hands to create something, there is a lot of pride that goes along with that. Julia did not discover her love for arts and crafts on her own but dedicates a lot of it to the things her mother and grandmother taught her when she was young.

Julia said her mother was always crafty, and her grandmother was a great painter who also taught her how to cross stitch. Although she says she was not that great at it, there is still something so powerful when having someone teach you a craft such as this. Although she originally thought teaching was something quite limiting, Julia has now come to understand the power of teaching needle arts to those who may not have had the same childhood she did.

“You want to be that inspirational person for these kids, and you want to create that environment where they are going to be excited about what they are doing,” says Julia while discussing her passion for working with The Handwork Studio. Even though it may not be where she thought she would be, having the ability to inspire a new generation of crafters fills Julia with an undeniable excitement. Julia believes that a lot of this creativity starts off “when we were little, and we are crafting and exploring,” and over the years, Julia has helped many little ones find their own creative gene within.

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Click here for a look at our summer sewing camp options for your child. Also, be sure to check out our store and our new partnership with Simplicity Sewing Patterns

Upgrade Your Back-to-School Wardrobe! 10 Fun & Crafty Ways to Upcycle Clothing

Posted by Marjanna Smith on Sun, Sep 02, 2018 @ 10:00 AM

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                      Source: Google Images

Looking for a fun, unique way to be creative with your family? How about a cheap and eco-friendly one? Try upcycling, the perfect combination of originality, creativity, and sustainability for you to try with your kids. Read on to find out what it is and how you can do it at home.

What is Upcycling?

Upcycling is the reuse or repurposing of an old object into a product that is more useful or more beautiful than the original. Upcycling can be super simple and kid-friendly -- for example, instead of throwing out old CDs and magazines, you can make them into mosaic picture frames and woven coasters. It can also be more complex, such as repainting and repairing a piece of furniture instead of kicking it to the curb.

Why is Upcycling Important?

You may be thinking, “Why should I take the time to upcycle? Isn’t recycling good enough?” Well, there are a lot of reasons why upcycling is so important. First, let’s establish the difference between recycling and upcycling. While recycling involves breaking down material to be reused (which decreases the material’s value), upcycling is all about finding new, creative ways to reuse the material (thus increasing its value)! So, like recycling, upcycling reduces the amount of landfill waste you generate; however, upcycling also creates a new product that has a functional and/or decorative use.

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                        Source: Google Images

Next, let’s talk about waste. Remember that helpful catchphrase that everyone uses when talking about how to be more eco-friendly? Reduce, reuse, recycle! Well, I recently learned that these three actions are actually in order of importance. First and foremost, we should make the effort to reduce the amount of things we buy and resources we use (i.e., taking shorter showers and avoiding impulse purchases that we don’t really need). Next is reusing, which includes upcycling! Last is recycling -- so, while it's obviously important to recycle, it is more important to prioritize those first two steps over recycling.  

What Can I Upcycle? Why Should I Upcycle Clothes?

Upcycling can be done with any object or material you can think of -- if you can repurpose, modify, or personalize it, you can upcycle it. For this post, I decided to focus on a popular material of choice for "upcyclers": clothing. Clothing is a great medium for upcycling because it is versatile, available, and can be modified in an infinite number of ways. Clothing is also a big issue when it comes to keeping our planet clean. In 2014, the U.S. alone generated approximately 32.44 billion pounds of textile waste even though 95% of all textiles have the potential to be reused or recycled. This number will only continue to increase unless we raise awareness of this issue and the different ways we can reduce, reuse, and recycle clothing.

Now that you’ve learned how upcycling is an economical, eco-friendly, and creative activity, you must be ready for some inspiration! Whether you have thrift store finds, hand-me-downs, or old clothes of your own, here are 10 different ways you can upcycle them with your kids.

1. Tie-Dye

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Tie-dye is a fun, kid-friendly way to upcycle that never goes out of style. This easy DIY will instantly upgrade any plain, light-colored clothes (and it can camouflage stains). Dye a t-shirt, tank top, skirt, pair of leggings -- or even accessories like headbands or socks! Thinking outside the box is encouraged. Let your kids’ imaginations lead the way as they combine colors and patterns into their own custom work of wearable art. Check out this guide to tie-dye for plenty of tips, tricks, and pattern ideas.

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Don’t have any white clothes laying around? Don’t worry! If you have solid-colored clothing, try tie-dyeing with bleach for a new twist on this classic activity.

2. Freezer Paper Stencil

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Who knew that you could use freezer paper and paint to add a design to a t-shirt? I didn’t until I found this tutorial on how to do it, and it looks as simple and fun as the pictured results.

3. T-Shirt Tote Bag

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Basically all you need to make this tote bag is an old t-shirt, sharp scissors, and 10 minutes. This no-sew project is a great way to repurpose a t-shirt that is too big or no longer worn.

4. Patches, Pins, and Appliques

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Personalize an old hand-me-down (or even cover up stains or holes) by adding some 3D art to your clothes! You can buy patches, pins, and appliques at craft stores and online, or you can make them yourself! See this tutorial for no-sew felt appliques and this tutorial for no-sew fabric flowers. And if you’re up to the challenge, you can try making embroidered patches by hand.

5. Stamped Clothes

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To make your own printed clothing, all you need is a stamp and some paint! You can buy stamps of all kinds at your local craft store, or you can make a quick DIY stamp out of a kitchen sponge, sponge brush, or even a potato! Then simply dip your stamp in acrylic or fabric paint and press it onto any piece of clothing that you want to make 100% cuter.

6.Throw Pillow

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Your child doesn’t have to say goodbye to that beloved t-shirt that has become too small to wear -- preserve it as a throw pillow! Try the no-sew, hand sewed, and machine sewed version depending on your available equipment and skill level. Leave the shirt plain or embellish it with buttons, sequins, fabric stickers, or paint designs! 

7. Unconventional Dye Techniques

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Looking for something different from the average tie-dye or bleach methods? Try using some Elmer’s glue to draw a design or make a pattern with found objects and let the sun do the work!

8. T-Shirt and Tank Top Upgrades

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Cutting up a top is a surprisingly popular DIY project -- and there are sooo many ways to do it. Turn a regular old t-shirt into a cold shoulder top, workout tank, or tie-front tank. Also, don’t hesitate to explore the internet for hundreds of other ideas.

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If you're looking to use an old shirt in a completely new way, you can repurpose t-shirt fabric! From a simple headband to a woven pillow, t-shirt “yarn” has many colorful and practical applications.

9. Peplum Shirt

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Embrace the timeless style of a peplum shape in your upcycling endeavors! Convert an oversized t-shirt into a peplum top or increase the charm (and length!) of a shirt by adding a different colored fabric for a trendy color block effect. While this project can be created through hand sewing, it is also an excellent way to practice and develop basic machine sewing skills.

10. Denim Shorts Upgrades

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Cut an old pair of jeans into shorts and make them stylish using a variety of techniques! This video shows how to do modifications such as adding lace, bleaching, painting, and adding patterned fabric.

 

Have fun with your new, upcycled clothes! And don’t forget to share your upcycling projects with us on Instagram using the hashtag #SewMoreLove so we can see your wonderful creations!

If you and your family is feeling inspired after your adventures in upcycling, make sure to check out The Handwork Studio’s camps and classes so your child can continue to make more handmade art! Our students flourish in our nurturing environment, and we encourage creativity and original projects while developing handwork and needlework techniques for multiple skill levels.

Quilting: Learn Its Unique American History and How to Start Making Your Own Quilt Today!

Posted by Cameron Lee on Sun, Aug 26, 2018 @ 10:10 AM

Good morning and welcome to the last of the summer activities blog posts! My final topic is somewhat fitting for these final days of summer vacation as we move into the chilly fall season: quilting! I remember helping to make class quilts when I was in elementary school, so I hope that this post inspires you and your kids to start your own family quilt today.Camper holding memory quilt-674506-edited

A quilt, as defined by Merriam Webster, is a “bed coverlet of two layers of cloth filled with padding (such as down or batting) held in place by ties or stitched designs.” Therefore, quilting is the process of making a quilt! Quilts have three main components: the top, a piece of fabric that is often decorated, the bottom, and the filler, which is the padded section sewn between the top and the bottom to form a kind of sandwich. Quilting has a history that predates the United States, but since the tradition of quilting is so intrinsic to the history of this country, I thought we could start there.

English, Welsh, and Dutch settlers brought their handwork skills with them when they traveled to the New World, as well as their knowledge of the use of padded fabrics in clothes, bedding, and armor all over the world. In the US, quilts had many uses throughout the years, starting mainly as a way to keep people warm at night and prevent cold wind from coming thro

Chintz Whole-Cloth Quilt, circa 1815, United States Courtesy American Folk Art Museum

ugh doors and windows, and evolving into an expressive art form. In the 1700s and 1800s, thousands of quilts were made by women in the US, and many were passed down for centuries.

One of the most popular forms of quilts in the early 1800s was a whole cloth quilt, which was made from a single piece of fabric on the top and another large piece on the bottom, and most of the decoration on this form of quilt was made using corded or padded material. Inspiration for whole cloth quilts came from East Indian fabrics because the highly valued imported Indian cotton was too prized to be cut into pieces. The medallion quilt is anoth

er kind that drew inspiration from Indian art and was decorated with a central image surrounded by other designs. The patchwork or pieced quilt was made from scraps of fabric sewn together, which saved crafters from having to buy large swaths of fabric. The applique quilt, on the other hand, was considered very elegant and was made by using extra pieces of fabric and incredibly detailed needlework to decorate the quilt. Only the wealthy typically had the time and expenses to make this type of quilt. Quilting was so crucial to American communities that it was a tradition for mothers to make their children quilts before they left the house, and for women to sew twelve quilts, including their bridal bed quilt before they were engaged.

“Log Cabin”—Single Block “Courthouse Steps” Variation, by Loretta Pettway, circa 1958Although quilting practices and foundations were brought to the US via European settlers, the country also has a history of African-American quilting traditions that trace back to slavery. Although most textiles in Africa were woven and not quilted, the bold, geometric, colorful aesthetics of fabrics like kente cloth served as inspiration for enslaved women, who were often taught to quilt in order to make help and serve their mistresses.

In the ‘50s and ‘60s, the practice of quilting died off some but came back in the ‘70s and ‘80s as people expressed a desire to return to handwork skills in the face of increased mechanization. Quilting became an important part of the feminist movements in the ‘70s because it served as means of artistic expression, and after the bicentennial celebration of the United States in 1976, it became a representation of national pride and love for the country.

Unlike sewing, the actual process of quilting hasn’t changed too much over the years, so it is a really cool way to feel connected to women who lived hundreds of years ago, and it is also an amazing way to create a family heirloom that can be passed down to your kids, their kids, and their kids! When starting out quilting, the most important tip is to keep it simple. Choose simple patterns with lots of straight lines, rectangles, and squares, use larger pieces of fabric so there will be less sewing involved, and maybe even buy patterns with precut fabrics so that you don’t have to spend time measuring and cutting your own. You will probably need sewing pins, safety pins, sewing scissors, thread, a seam ripper, a measurement tool, a fabric pencil or a marker, and a rotary cutter, as well as your fabric and patterns! The four stages of quilting include preparation, making the quilt top, quilting, and finally binding it all together, and if you can sew a straight line and are willing to follow instructions, you can definitely make your own quilt! Quilt by Emma Redmond

Now that you’ve learned all about the uniquely American history of quilting, you can grab your kids and get started on your own! For detailed quilting instructions, check out this awesome blog or this great article. If you want your child to have handwork experience but you’re not sure about helping them yourself, you can always send them to the Handwork Studio’s amazing classes.

Finally, I hope everyone has an incredible school year! It’s been awesome learning about different kinds of handwork with you this summer, and I hope this blog series inspired you to get out there and try these crafts yourself! As always, post a picture of your incredible creations on Instagram with the hashtag #SewMoreLove so we can see your art! Happy quilting!

Image Descriptions:
1) Camper holding Memory Quilt, Handwork Studio camp
2) Chintz Whole-Cloth Quilt, 1810-1820
3) Quilt by artist Loretta Pettway, 1958 
4) Quilt by artist Emma Redmond